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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Advances in Boron Essentiality Research: Symposium Summary

Authors
item Coughlin, James - COUGHLIN & ASSOCIATES
item Nielsen, Forrest

Submitted to: International Society For Trace Elements Research In Humans
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: June 14, 1999
Publication Date: October 1, 1999
Citation: Coughlin, J.R., Nielsen, F.H. 1999. Advances in boron essentiality research: Symposium summary. In: Abdulla, M., Bost, M., Gamon, S., Arnaud, P., Chazot, G., editors. Vth Conference of the International Society for Trace Element Research in Humans Proceedings. Bedford, UK:LSL Press. p.33-41.

Interpretive Summary: Presentations are summarized of 9 participants in a symposium focused on advances in showing that boron is a nutritionally important element. These presentations described findings that has solidified the acceptance of boron as an essential nutrient. These findings included boron deprivation interrupting the life cycle of the frog by interfering with normal development and reproductive function; inducing an eye disorder and embry death in zebrafish; and impairing immune function and exacerbating induced arthritis in rats. Studies with mouse embryos gave results suggesting that culturing embryos in a boron deficient medium exacerbates a boron deficient state generated in utero as a result of depletion of boron in critical maternal tissue; and that a boron luxuriant medium reverses embryonic boron deficiency generated in utero. Data were presented showing that boron homeostasis is primarily regulated by the kidney with urinary boron excretion usually 84 to 90% of intake irrespective of the amount of dietary boron consumed; and that urinary boron is a sensitive indicator of recent boron intake. One presentation described the analytical challenges in determining low amounts of boron in biological samples and provided many techniques that can assist analysts in overcoming the challenges. Finally, boron dietary intake data were presented for six countries, United States, Germany, Great Britain, Mexico, Kenya and Egypt. The data indicated that many people in the world consume less than 1.0 mg/d. Because findings from both human and animal experiments suggest that somewhere between 0.5 and 1.0 mg/d is the lower limit of boron intake that assures beneficial health effects, the intake data indicate that boron may be a practical nutritional concern.

Technical Abstract: Presentations are summarized of 9 participants in a symposium focused on advances in showing that boron is a nutritionally important element. These presentations described findings that has solidified the acceptance of boron as an essential nutrient. These findings included boron deprivation interrupting the life cycle of the frog by interfering with normal development and reproductive function; inducing an eye disorder and embry death in zebrafish; and impairing immune function and exacerbating induced arthritis in rats. Studies with mouse embryos gave results suggesting that culturing embryos in a boron deficient medium exacerbates a boron deficient state generated in utero as a result of depletion of boron in critical maternal tissue; and that a boron luxuriant medium reverses embryonic boron deficiency generated in utero. Data were presented showing that boron homeostasis is primarily regulated by the kidney with urinary boron excretion usually 84 to 90% of intake irrespective of the amount of dietary boron consumed; and that urinary boron is a sensitive indicator of recent boron intake. One presentation described the analytical challenges in determining low amounts of boron in biological samples and provided many techniques that can assist analysts in overcoming the challenges. Finally, boron dietary intake data were presented for six countries, United States, Germany, Great Britain, Mexico, Kenya and Egypt. The data indicated that many people in the world consume less than 1.0 mg/d. Because findings from both human and animal experiments suggest that somewhere between 0.5 and 1.0 mg/d is the lower limit of boron intake that assures beneficial health effects, the intake data indicate that boron may be a practical nutritional concern.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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