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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Trace Mineral Supplementation on Cow-Calf Performance, Reproduction and Immune Function

Authors
item Stanton, T - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Whittier, Jack - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Geary, Thomas
item Kimberling, C - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Johnson, A - COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Beef Research Report
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 1999
Publication Date: April 1, 1999
Citation: STANTON, T.L., WHITTIER, J.C., GEARY, T.W., KIMBERLING, C.V., JOHNSON, A.B. EFFECT OF TRACE MINERAL SUPPLEMENTATION ON COW-CALF PERFORMANCE, REPRODUCTION AND IMMUNE FUNCTION. BEEF RESEARCH REPORT. COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY. 1999. P. 1-14.

Interpretive Summary: Three hundred Angus cows were used in a randomized design to evaluate trace mineral supplementation over a 209 day trial on cow and calf performance, liver trace mineral content and immune function. Treatments included the following supplemental trace minerals: (1) inorganic trace minerals - low level; (2) inorganic trace minerals - high level; and (3) organic trace minerals - high level. Cows fed the inorganic trace minerals - high level lost more weight (P<.05) than cows fed the other treatments. Cow condition score was not affected by treatment. Calf average daily gain on the organic - high level were higher (P<.05) from birth to May 13 and May 13 to September 24 compared to the other treatments. Cows pregnant to artificial insemination were higher (P<0.05) when fed the organic high level of trace mineral compared to the other treatments. Trace mineral supplementation had an equivocal impact on liver trace minerals over time. Cell-mediated immune function was not affected by type or level of trace mineral supplementation.

Technical Abstract: Three hundred Angus cows were used in a randomized design to evaluate trace mineral supplementation over a 209 day trial on cow and calf performance, liver trace mineral content and immune function. Treatments included the following supplemental trace minerals: (1) inorganic trace minerals - low level; (2) inorganic trace minerals - high level; and (3) organic trace minerals - high level. Cows fed the inorganic trace minerals - high level lost more weight (P<.05) than cows fed the other treatments. Cow condition score was not affected by treatment. Calf average daily gain on the organic - high level were higher (P<.05) from birth to May 13 and May 13 to September 24 compared to the other treatments. Cows pregnant to artificial insemination were higher (P<0.05) when fed the organic high level of trace mineral compared to the other treatments. Trace mineral supplementation had an equivocal impact on liver trace minerals over time. Cell-mediated immune function was not affected by type or level of trace mineral supplementation.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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