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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic Aspects of Seed Dormancy in Wild Oats

Author
item Foley, Michael

Submitted to: Plant Dormancy Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 14, 1999
Publication Date: July 19, 1999
Citation: Foley, M.E. 1999. Genetic aspects of seed dormancy in wild oats. [Abstract]Second International Symposium on Plant Dormancy. Page No. 17.

Interpretive Summary: Wild oat is used as an experimental system to investigate dormancy and afterripening under warm-dry conditions. Dormancy in wild oat is controlled by the action and interaction of genetic and environmental factors. To investigate the inheritance of dormancy, we cross-pollinated a well characterized and highly inbred dormant (M73) and nondormant (SH430) line of wild oat. Germinability was evaluated for seeds in an F2, backcross, and a recombinant inbred (RI) line population segregating for dormancy. The data were used to develop a genetic model for dormancy, identify molecular markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for dormancy, and investigate a genotype by environmental interaction on germinability. Nondormancy is dominant and at least three genes regulate dormancy in wild oat. One or more of these genes is responsive to germination temperature. Bulked segregant analysis and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques were used to identified two independently segregating markers that are linked in coupling with QTL for dormancy in wild oat. Additional and more tightly linked molecular markers will be crucial for determining allelic interactions, epistatic interactions, genotype by environmental interactions, and for cloning dormancy QTL.

Technical Abstract: Wild oat is used as an experimental system to investigate dormancy and afterripening under warm-dry conditions. Dormancy in wild oat is controlled by the action and interaction of genetic and environmental factors. To investigate the inheritance of dormancy, we cross-pollinated a well characterized and highly inbred dormant (M73) and nondormant (SH430) line of wild oat. Germinability was evaluated for seeds in an F2, backcross, and a recombinant inbred (RI) line population segregating for dormancy. The data were used to develop a genetic model for dormancy, identify molecular markers associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for dormancy, and investigate a genotype by environmental interaction on germinability. Nondormancy is dominant and at least three genes regulate dormancy in wild oat. One or more of these genes is responsive to germination temperature. Bulked segregant analysis and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques were used to identified two independently segregating markers that are linked in coupling with QTL for dormancy in wild oat. Additional and more tightly linked molecular markers will be crucial for determining allelic interactions, epistatic interactions, genotype by environmental interactions, and for cloning dormancy QTL.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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