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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of Perennial Glycine Species for Resistance to Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum (Sclerotinia Stem Rot) and Fusarium Solani F. Sp. Glycines (Sudden Death Syndrome)

Authors
item HARTMAN, GLEN
item Gardner, Meredith - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Hymowitz, Theodore - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Naidoo, Gnanambal - UNIV OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 10, 1999
Publication Date: November 5, 1999
Citation: Hartman, G.L., Gardner, M.E., Hymowitz, T., Naidoo, G.C. 1999. Evaluation of perennial glycine species for resistance to sclerotinia sclerotiorum (sclerotinia stem rot) and fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (sudden death syndrome). Crop Science. 40:545-549.

Interpretive Summary: Two of the most important fungal pathogens on soybean cause Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) and sudden death syndrome (SDS). Control of these diseases is important to growers to maintain high yields. One approach to control these diseases is through host plant resistance. The objective of this study was to screen all the available accessions of the perennial Glycine species for resistance. The perennial Glycine species represent an untapped resource of potentially novel genes for improving traits in soybeans including disease resistance. In the initial evaluation of 787 perennial Glycine accessions screened for resistance to the pathogen causing SSR, 183 accessions had plants with greater than 75% survival. G. tabacina had the highest percentage of accessions with plant survival frequencies over 75% (144 out of 232 accessions screened). In the initial evaluation of 767 accessions screened for resistance to the pathogen causing SDS, 134 had disease severity ratings less than two on a one to five disease severity scale where one is most resistant. These perennial Glycine species represent untapped sources for improving traits in soybean including disease resistance. This information will be used by geneticists, and sets the stage whereby useful germplasm within the wild perennial Glycine species can be utilized by soybean breeders.

Technical Abstract: Accessions of perennial Glycine species were evaluated for resistance to soybean fungal pathogens that cause Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) and sudden death syndrome (SDS). Both of these diseases can cause reductions in soybean yields and resistance is potentially one management tool to reduce yield losses. In the initial evaluation of 787 perennial Glycine accessions screened for resistance to the pathogen causing SSR, 183 accessions had plants with greater than 75% survival. G. tabacina had the highest percentage of accessions with plant survival frequencies over 75% (144 out of 232 accessions screened). Other species that had some accessions that had plant survival frequencies over 75% were G. latifolia (16 out of 42 accessions screened) and G. microphalli (eight out of 31 accessions screened). Resistant accessions to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum were not found in G. arenaria, G. argyrea, G. curvata, G. cyrtoloba, G. latrobeana, or G. pindanica. In the initial evaluation of 767 accessions screened for resistance to the pathogen causing SDS, 134 had disease severity ratings less than two on a one to five disease severity scale where one is most resistant. At least a few accessions in G. argyrea, G. canescens, G. clandestine, G. curvata, G. cyrtoloba, G. falcate, G. latifolia, G. tabicina, and G. tomentella had disease severity ratings less than two. These perennial Glycine species represent untapped sources for improving traits in soybean including disease resistance.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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