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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Developing Genomic Approaches to Improve Resistance to Diseases and Aflatoxin Contamination in Peanut and Corn

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: Advances in proteomics research for peanut genetics and breeding

Authors
item Katam, Ramesh -
item Gottschalk, Virginia -
item Survajahala, Prashanth -
item Brewster, George -
item Payton, Paxton
item Sakata, Katsumi -
item Ching, Lee -
item Williams, Crayger -
item Guo, Baozhu
item Latinwo, Lekan -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2013
Publication Date: May 5, 2014
Citation: Katam, R., Gottschalk, V., Survajahala, P., Brewster, G., Payton, P.R., Sakata, K., Ching, L., Williams, C., Guo, B., Latinwo, L.M. 2014. Advances in proteomics research for peanut genetics and breeding. In: Mallikarjuna, N., Varshney R.K. Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Peanuts. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. p.161-177.

Interpretive Summary: Peanuts are an important source of dietary protein in many developing nations, and provide an important source of cooking oil. Biological fixation of nitrogen further makes peanut an important crop for improving soil fertility and crop rotations. However there are many biotic and abiotic factors limiting peanut production and quality. In this regard, the application of “-omics” techniques combined with field-level agronomic conventional research will deliver novel insight into previously unknown or apparently unrelated interactions associated with developmental and environmental cues that combine to give the ideal plant phenotype. The challenge for the peanut research community, and all crop species, will be to ensure that “-omics” capabilities and data are generated, interpreted, and integrated towards application in crop improvement. Peanuts are a globally important renewable source of oil, protein, and carbohydrate for edible and industrial applications. Production areas range from subtropical, water-abundant regions to semi-arid regions around the world. The primary limitations to production vary across regions and the major areas of production research address: 1) allergenicity and human nutrition, 2) abiotic stress, primarily water-deficit stress, and 3) biotic stress. In this chapter, we describe the current knowledge regarding the peanut proteome, new technologies, limitations to proteomics, and future“-omics” approaches using example studies addressing allergenicity, water deficit stress, and Aspergillus flavus infection and food safety. Additionally, perspectives are presented on potential applications of these technologies to molecular breeding, metabolic engineering, and elucidation of stress-response pathways.

Technical Abstract: Crop trait improvement aimed at increased yield and quality relies on an understanding of the biology of the plant, particular protein-protein interactions. In this regard, the application of “-omics” techniques combined with field-level agronomy is poised to deliver novel insight into previously unknown or apparently unrelated interactions associated with developmental and environmental cues that combine to give the final plant phenotype. The challenge for the peanut research community, and all crop species, will be to ensure that “-omics” capabilities and data are generated, interpreted, and integrated towards crop improvement. Peanuts are a globally important renewable source of oil, protein, and carbohydrate for edible and industrial applications. Production areas range from subtropical, water-abundant regions to semi-arid regions around the world. The primary limitations to production vary across regions and the major areas of production research address: 1) allergenicity and human nutrition, 2) abiotic stress, primarily water-deficit stress, and 3) biotic stress. In this chapter, we describe the current knowledge regarding the peanut proteome, new technologies, limitations to proteomics, and future“-omics” approaches using example studies addressing allergenicity, thermal and water deficit stress, and Aspergillus infection. Additionally, perspectives are presented on potential applications of these technologies to molecular breeding, metabolic engineering, and elucidation of stress-response pathways.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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