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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR INSECT PESTS OF ORCHARD CROPS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Maintenance of primary cell cultures of immunocytes from Cacopsylla sp. psyllids: a new in vitrio tool for the study of pest insects

Authors
item Monti, M -
item Mandrioli, M -
item Bextine, Blake -
item Hunter, Wayne
item Alma, A -
item Tedeschi, R -

Submitted to: In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Animals
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 20, 2014
Publication Date: June 17, 2014
Citation: Monti, M., Mandrioli, M., Bextine, B., Hunter, W.B., Alma, A., Tedeschi, R. 2014. Maintenance of primary cell cultures of immunocytes from Cacopsylla sp. psyllids: a new in vitrio tool for the study of pest insects. In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Animals. Doi:10.1007/s11626-014-9785-7.

Interpretive Summary: Psyllid species are major vectors of plant pathogens which threaten production of fruit tee crops and vegetables worldwide. Primary cell cultures were developed from three psyllid species - Cacopsylla melanoneura, Cacopsylla pyri and Cacopsylla crataegi. The medium used was Hert-Hunter 70, HH70 psyllid medium, developed originally for studies with the Asian citrus psyllid. Survival and proliferation of the Cacopsylla immunocytes for over 60 d were observed, with mitotic activities starting at 15-d post culture. These primary cultures are advancing development of solutions to reduce phytoplasma–psyllid cell interactions, to stop disease spread.

Technical Abstract: Psyllid species are major vectors of plant pathogens, such as phytoplasmas and Liberibacter bacteria, which threaten economic stability of fruit tee crops and vegetable production worldwide. Primary cell cultures of immunocytes have been developed from the three psyllid species, Cacopsylla melanoneura, Cacopsylla pyri (vectors of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma mali’ and ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma pyri’, respectively) and Cacopsylla crataegi. The medium most suitable of those evaluated was Hert-Hunter 70, HH70 psyllid medium, developed for studies in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, (Kuwayama). Survival and proliferation of the Cacopsylla immunocytes for over 60 d were observed, with mitotic activities starting at 15-d post culture. Moreover, adhesion and phagocytosis activities were confirmed for all the psyllid cell cultures by functionality tests. Morphological examination of cultured immunocytes revealed the presence of different cell types. These primary cultures are advancing studies in phytoplasma –psyllid cell interactions.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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