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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Production, Profit, and Environmental Stewardship through Conservation Systems

Location: National Soil Dynamics Laboratory

Title: Host status of noxious weed plants associated with Gossypium hirisutum-Zea mays rotation systems to Rotylenchulus reniformis

Authors
item Dismukes, A -
item Lawrence, K -
item Price, Andrew
item Lawrence, G -
item Akridge, R -

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 3, 2006
Publication Date: January 3, 2006
Citation: Dismukes, A.L., Lawrence, K.L., Price, A.J., Lawrence, G.W., Akridge, R. 2006. Host status of noxious weed plants associated with Gossypium hirisutum-Zea mays rotation systems to Rotylenchulus reniformis. In: Boyd, S., et al., Editors. Proceedings of the National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference, January 3-6, 2006, San Antonio, Texas. p. 7-11.

Interpretive Summary: The reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) is considered to be the major nematode problem of upland cotton (Gossypium hirisutum) in the southeast and mid south. Recently populations of the reniform nematode have been maintained in a few cotton-corn rotations; thus it has been proposed that the noxious weeds associated with the rotation scheme may be hosts for this nematode and sustain populations during the corn production season. To test this hypothesis, selected weed species were screened for host status to the reniform nematode in the greenhouse. A field trial was also conducted in a reniform infested cotton field located in Huxford, Alabama. Greenhouse trials indicated that of the 28 species tested, the majority of dicotyledonous noxious weed species have the capability to serve as host to the reniform nematode while the monocotyledonous weeds did not. In microplot studies, corn growing in combination with several of the individual weed species tested increases the reniform nematode populations. Noxious weed species in corn plots with only a pre emergence herbicide application increase reniform nematode populations as compared to the weedfree treatments. Noxious weed plants associated with the cotton-corn rotation system potentially may be the cause of persistent reniform populations when rotating with a non-host rotation crop.

Technical Abstract: The reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) is considered to be the major nematode problem of upland cotton (Gossypium hirisutum) in the southeast and mid south. A rotation system of cotton to corn is often utilized as a management technique because corn (Zea mays) is not a host to R. reniformis and will reduce populations. Many of the weed problems between the crops are similar. Recently populations of the reniform nematode have been maintained in a few cotton-corn rotations; thus it has been proposed that the noxious weeds associated with the rotation scheme may be hosts for this nematode and sustain populations during the corn production season. To test this hypothesis, selected weed species were screened for host status to the reniform nematode in the greenhouse. Corn and individual weed species populations were grown simultaneously in a microplot field study to evaluate reniform population density changes. A field trial was also conducted in a reniform infested cotton field located in Huxford, Alabama. Corn was grown under four herbicide regimes simulating various weed densities to determine if the noxious weed s associated with the cotton-corn rotation system would maintain or increase reniform nematode numbers. Greenhouse trials indicated that of the 28 species tested, the majority of dicotyledonous noxious weed species have the capability to serve as host to the reniform nematode while the monocotyledonous weeds did not. In microplot studies, corn growing in combination with several of the individual weed species tested increases the reniform nematode populations. Noxious weed species in corn plots with only a pre emergence herbicide application increase reniform nematode populations as compared to the weedfree treatments. Noxious weed plants associated with the cotton-corn rotation system potentially may be the cause of persistent reniform populations when rotating with a non-host rotation crop.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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