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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOCONTROL AGENT PRODUCTION AND DEPLOYMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF PLANT PATHOGENS

Location: Crop Bioprotection Research

Title: Deposition of extreme-tolerant bacterial strains isolated during different phases of phoenix spacecraft assembly in a public culture collection

Authors
item Venkateswaran, Kasthuri -
item Vaishampayan, Parag -
item Benardini Iii, James -
item Rooney, Alejandro
item Spry, J -

Submitted to: Astrobiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 5, 2013
Publication Date: January 10, 2014
Citation: Venkateswaran, K., Vaishampayan, P., Benardini III, J.N., Rooney, A.P., Spry, J.A. 2014. Deposition of extreme-tolerant bacterial strains isolated during different phases of Phoenix spacecraft assembly in a public culture collection. Astrobiology. 14(1):24-26.

Interpretive Summary: This manuscript describes the isolation, characterization and archival of extreme-tolerant bacteria isolated as part of a collaborative effort between the USDA-ARS and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Bacteria that tolerate extreme environmental conditions possess unique biochemical characteristics that make them attractive for various agricultural or biotechnological applications. Archiving extreme-tolerant microorganisms from NASA missions into ARS microbial collections provides opportunities for scientists conducting research on agricultural application of such microoganisms and for private industry partners interested in exploring their potential commercial uses.

Technical Abstract: Extreme-tolerant bacteria (82 strains; 67 species) isolated during various assembly phases of the Phoenix spacecraft were permanently archived within the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service Culture Collection in Peoria, Illinois. This represents the first microbial collection of spacecraft associated surfaces within the United States to be deposited into a freely available, government-funded culture collection. Archiving extreme-tolerant microorganisms from NASA mission(s) will provide opportunities for scientists who are involved in exploring microbes that can tolerate extreme conditions. Key Words: Acidophile—Alkaliphile—Extremophiles—Planetary protection—Mission. Astrobiology 14, 24–26.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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