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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Integrated Pest Management for Insect Pests of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Factors affecting flight capacity and invasive characteristics of brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

Authors
item Wiman, Nik -
item Walton, Vaughn -
item Shearer, Peter -
item Rondon, Sylvia -
item Lee, Jana

Submitted to: Journal of Pest Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2014
Publication Date: March 29, 2014
Citation: Wiman, N., Walton, V., Shearer, P., Rondon, S., Lee, J.C. 2014. Factors affecting flight capacity and invasive characteristics of brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Journal of Pest Science. DOI:10.1007.

Interpretive Summary: The Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is an invasive pest of many crops in the eastern United States and has been become recently abundant in the Pacific Northwest. In Oregon, this pest has become common in urban areas interspersed among ornamental plants. We tested the flight capacity of BMSB by tethering adults to a rotating arm attached to a computer monitor (flight mill). Specifically, we looked at flight patterns between overwintered adults vs. summer generation adults, and males vs. females on flight distance, frequency, velocity, and time-of-day. Insects clearly fell into two groups: ones that flew 5 km or less and ones that flew more than 5 km in 24 h. Summer generation females flew further and faster than overwintered males and females. Weight was not related to the total distance flown by adults, overwintered BMSB lost a greater proportion of their pre-flight body weight during the assay than did the summer generation adults. From this study, BMSB showed the capacity to fly long distances, particularly in summer generation.

Technical Abstract: Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) is a highly destructive invasive pest of annual and perennial crops in the eastern United States and is an increasing threat to agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. In Oregon, this pest has become common in urban areas interspersed among high-value specialty crops that are known hosts plants. In this paper, we utilized flight mills to address some basic questions on flight capacity of H. halys in order to better understand its invasive characteristics. Specifically, we examined generational, sexual, and phenotypical effects on flight distance, frequency, velocity, and diel flight patterns of field-collected H. halys. Filed collected insects were classified as either overwintered or summer generation adults. There was a clear dichotomy in total flight distance for insects that flew 5 km or less and those that flew more than 5 km in 24 h, which became the focus for our analysis. Summer generation females flew further and faster than overwintered males and females. Weight was not related to the total distance flown by adults, overwintered H. halys lost a greater proportion of their pre-flight body weight during the assay than did the summer generation adults. Despite the many limitations extrapolating flight mill data to the field, this study nonetheless provided evidence that H. halys have capacity for long distance flight, particularly in summer generation. The nutritional status and fat reserves of overwintered versus summer generation adults are discussed as potential explanations for the flight and weight loss patterns found in this study.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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