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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Sustainable management of insect-resistant GE crops

Authors
item Fleischer, S -
item Hutchison, W -
item Naranjo, Steven

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 25, 2013
Publication Date: July 31, 2014
Citation: Fleischer, S., Hutchison, W.D., Naranjo, S.E. 2014. Sustainable management of insect-resistant GE crops. Book Chapter. 115-127. Plant Biotechnology - Experience and Future Prospects, A. Ricroch, S. Chopra, S. Fleischer (eds.), Springer, Dordrecht-Heidelberg-London-New York.

Interpretive Summary: Crop genetically engineered to provide resistance to specific groups of insect pests have been adopted by millions of growers throughout the world. Here we document the effects of transgenic crops on pest population densities, beneficial insect densities and biological control services, insecticide use patterns, pesticide poisonings, and economics. Resistance management makes clear that we are also dealing with effects on population genetics. The effects occur at scales that transcend the land planted to the transgenic crop. Values relevant to discussions about sustainability exist for deployment of insect-resistant genetically engineered crops. Missing from many discussions, at least for vegetable and fruit crops, are farm-workers. Sustainable management of insect-resistant transgenic crops is requiring consideration and management of regional effects of both densities and genetics of mobile insect populations. The underlying assumption of IPM, that multiple and diverse management tactics are more sustainable, continues to be highly relevant.

Technical Abstract: Crop genetically engineered to provide resistance to specific groups of insect pests have been adopted by millions of growers throughout the world. Here we document the effects of transgenic crops on pest population densities, beneficial insect densities and biological control services, insecticide use patterns, pesticide poisonings, and economics. Resistance management makes clear that we are also dealing with effects on population genetics. The effects occur at scales that transcend the land planted to the transgenic crop. Values relevant to discussions about sustainability exist for deployment of insect-resistant genetically engineered crops. Missing from many discussions, at least for vegetable and fruit crops, are farm-workers. Sustainable management of insect-resistant transgenic crops is requiring consideration and management of regional effects of both densities and genetics of mobile insect populations. The underlying assumption of IPM, that multiple and diverse management tactics are more sustainable, continues to be highly relevant.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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