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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Seasonality in women’s dietary intake: preliminary results from the Life in all Seasons (LENAS) study

Authors
item Jahns, Lisa
item Johnson, Luann -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2014
Publication Date: April 30, 2014
Citation: Jahns, L.A., Johnson, L.K. 2014. Seasonality in women’s dietary intake: preliminary results from the Life in all Seasons (LENAS) study. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 28:1022.5.

Technical Abstract: Objective: Seasonal variation in foods consumed may bias estimates of long-term food and nutrient intake in observational studies. We present dietary results from the first cohort of subjects in a year-long study of predictors of change in body composition. Methods: Longitudinal design; 27 women ages 40-60 y completed online diet recalls approximately every 10 days (N=972) using the Automated Self-administered 24-hour Recall system. Reported intakes were compared to Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) recommendations and seasonal differences tested by mixed model analysis of variance. Results: Mean energy intake was not significantly different from estimated requirements (P = 0.23). Compared to Dietary Reference Intakes, recommendations, intakes of fiber, vitamin E, potassium, and vitamin D were inadequate and did not differ by season. Over the year, women reported consuming 63 ± 3% of the DGA recommended number of servings for vegetables, fruits (73 ± 10%); whole grains (36 ± 4%), seafood (54 ± 9%) and dairy (63 ± 5%). Grain intake was significantly higher in the fall compared to spring and summer (P<0.05) and intake of “other” vegetables was higher in summer than winter (P<0.05). Conclusions: Nutrient intake did not vary seasonally in this sample of women. Intakes of key nutrients and nutrient-rich food groups of public health significance were suboptimal.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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