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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ZOONOTIC PARASITES AFFECTING FOOD SAFETY AND PUBLIC HEALTH

Location: Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory

Title: First report of Enterocytozoon bieneusi from dairy cattle in South America

Authors
item Del Coco, Valeria -
item Cordoba, Maria -
item Bilbao, Gladys -
item Pinto DE Almeida, Aldana -
item Basualdo, Juan -
item Santin-Duran, Monica

Submitted to: Veterinary Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 19, 2013
Publication Date: January 12, 2014
Citation: Del Coco, V.F., Cordoba, M.A., Bilbao, G., Pinto De Almeida, A., Basualdo, J.A., Santin, M. 2014. First report of Enterocytozoon bieneusi from dairy cattle in South America. Veterinary Parasitology. 199(2014):112-115.

Interpretive Summary: Microsporidia are microscopic fungi that infect all major animal groups from invertebrates to fish to birds and mammals, including domesticated animals and humans. Enterocytozoon bieneusi is the most commonly reported species of microsporidia in humans. It has also been reported worldwide in animals of veterinary importance bringing into question the possible role of animal reservoirs in the epidemiology of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to identify the genotypes present in dairy calves in Buenos Aires, Argentina and verify what risks cattle represent in transmission of E. bieneusi, since there is no such information to date in Argentina. Seventy samples of cattle feces were collected from 23 dairy farms in 11 municipalities located in Buenos Aires. After removal of fecal debris by sieving and sucrose flotation, specimens were subjected to PCR to detect the presence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Ten calves were E. bieneusi positive from 7 municipalities. Gene sequence analysis conducted in all samples positives by PCR revealed the presence of six genotypes; four previously reported in cattle as well as humans (D, I, J, and BEB4), one never reported in cattle before but previously reported in humans (EbpC), and one novel genotype (BEB10). These results constitute the first molecular characterization of E. bieneusi in cattle in South America, and suggest a potential risk of zoonotic transmission in this area.

Technical Abstract: Fecal specimens were obtained from a total of 70 dairy calves less than two months old on 11 municipalities in Buenos Aires, Argentina. After removal of fecal debris by sieving and sucrose flotation, specimens were subjected to PCR to detect the presence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi. PCR revealed a 14.28% of prevalence for E. bieneusi with 10 positive calves from 7 municipalities. Gene sequence analysis conducted in all samples positives by PCR revealed the presence of six genotypes; four previously reported in cattle as well as humans (D, I, J, and BEB4), one never reported in cattle before but previously reported in humans (EbpC), and one novel genotype (BEB10). These results constitute the first molecular characterization of E. bieneusi in Argentina, and suggest a potential risk of zoonotic transmission in this area.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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