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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Insecticide Resistance Management and New Control Strategies for Pests of Corn, Cotton, Sorghum, Soybean, and Sweet Potato

Location: Southern Insect Management Research Unit

Title: Survey of thrips species infesting cotton across the southern U.S. cotton belt

Authors
item Stewart, Scott -
item Akin, Scott -
item Reed, Jack -
item Bacheler, Jack -
item Catchot, Angus -
item Cook, Don -
item Gore, Jeff -
item Greene, Jeremy -
item Herbert, Ames -
item Jackson, Ryan
item Kerns, David -
item Leonard, Roger -
item Lorenz, Gus -
item Micinski, Stephen -
item Reisig, Dominic -
item Roberts, Phillip -
item Studebaker, Glenn -
item Tindall, Kelly -
item Toews, Michael -

Submitted to: Journal of Cotton Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 27, 2013
Publication Date: December 1, 2013
Citation: Stewart, S.D., Akin, S.A., Reed, J., Bacheler, J., Catchot, A., Cook, D., Gore, J., Greene, J., Herbert, A., Jackson, R.E., Kerns, D., Leonard, R., Lorenz, G.M., Micinski, S., Reisig, D., Roberts, P., Studebaker, G., Tindall, K., Toews, M. 2013. Survey of thrips species infesting cotton across the southern U.S. cotton belt. Journal of Cotton Science. 17(4):263-269.

Interpretive Summary: Species composition of adult thrips infesting upland cotton with various at-planting insecticides was determined in 2009 and 2010. Although species composition of adult thrips varied among all locations, tobacco thrips (Frankliniella fusca [Hinds]) was the dominant species at most locations, particularly in non-treated cotton. Other thrips species were more predominant in cotton treated with at-planting insecticide (imidacloprid and thiamethoxam seed treatments or aldicarb in-furrow). Results suggest that tobacco thrips are relatively more sensitive to these insecticides, whereas preventative, at-planting insecticides in cotton may be less effective on other thrips species.

Technical Abstract: A survey investigating the composition of adult thrips species and the effect of preventive, at-plant insecticides on this composition was conducted at multiple locations across the upland U.S. Cotton Belt in 2009 and 2010. Small-plot experiments included insecticide seed treatments containing imidacloprid (Aeris®) or thiamethoxam (Avicta Complete Cotton®), in-furrow applications of insecticide aldicarb (Temik®), and an untreated control (no at-planting insecticide). The species composition of adult thrips varied among all locations which included trials within Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia. As was the case in previous studies, tobacco thrips (Frankliniella fusca [Hinds]) was the dominant species at most locations. This species comprised an even greater percentage of the species composition in cotton not treated with insecticide. Conversely, the percent composition of other species tended to increase in cotton treated with insecticide. These observations suggest that tobacco thrips are relatively more sensitive to these insecticides. Overall, aldicarb reduced populations of adults more than other treatments, particularly imidacloprid.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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