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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: AGRICULTURAL LAND MANAGEMENT TO OPTIMIZE PRODUCTIVITY AND NATURAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION AT FARM AND WATERSHED SCALES

Location: Great Plains Agroclimate and Natural Resources Research Unit

Title: Upper Washita River Experimental Watersheds: Physiography Data

Authors
item Moriasi, Daniel
item Starks, Patrick
item Steiner, Jean
item Guzman Jaimes, Jorge
item Allen, Paul -
item Naney, James -

Submitted to: Journal of Environmental Quality
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 8, 2014
Publication Date: July 14, 2014
Citation: Moriasi, D.N., Starks, P.J., Steiner, J.L., Guzman Jaimes, J.A., Allen, P.B., Naney, J.W. 2014. Upper Washita River experimental watersheds: Physiography data. Journal of Environmental Quality. 43:1298-1309.

Interpretive Summary: Spatially distributed data such as digital elevation models (DEMs), soils, geology, and stream channel network characteristics, are important to understanding the complex hydrologic cycle and chemical transport processes of a study area. A detailed description of available spatially distributed datasets in the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed (LWREW) and Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watershed (FCREW), located in the southwest Oklahoma, is lacking. This paper describes paper describes available DEM products and use; soils data and their impact on hydrology, erosion, and chemical transport; geologic formations data and their impact on hydrology and chemical transport; and channel stream network stability data and their uses. Data collection is a collaborative effort between USGS and USDA NRCS and ARS. These datasets have been used for several research applications by USDA ARS scientists and researchers from other institutions and agencies. Plans for detailed geomorphic assessment of stream channel network in the FCREW are underway in collaboration with Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Collected geomorphic assessment data will enable updating of the channel stability stage condition since they have been several major rainfall events in the watershed since the last 2006 geomorphic assessment in the two watersheds.

Technical Abstract: Physiographic data such as digital elevation models (DEMs), soils, geology, stream channel network characteristics, and channel stability data are essential for understanding the complex hydrologic cycle and chemical transport processes of any given study area. This paper describes physiographic data available in the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed (LWREW) and Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watershed (FCREW). Specifically this paper describes 1) available DEM products and use; 2) available soils data and discusses the impact of different soil physical properties on hydrology, erosion, and chemical transport; 3) different geologic formations in the LWREW and FCREW and their impact on hydrology and chemical transport; and 4) available rapid geomorphic assessment (RGA) measurements and their uses. Data collection is a collaborative effort between USGS and USDA NRCS and ARS. These datasets have been used for several research applications by USDA ARS scientists and researchers from other institutions and agencies. Plans for detailed geomorphic assessment of stream channel network in the FCREW are underway in collaboration with Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Collected data will enable updating of the channel stability stage condition since there have been several major rainfall events in the watershed since the last geomorphic assessment in the two watersheds.

Last Modified: 10/26/2014
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