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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED APPROACHES FOR PROTECTION OF ANIMALS FROM VECTOR-BORNE PATHOGENS

Location: Arthropod-Borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Molecular phylogenetic profiling of gut-associated bacteria in larvae and adults of flesh flies (Sarcophaga spp.)

Authors
item Gupta, Arvind -
item Rastogi, Gurdeep -
item Nayduch, Dana
item Bhonde, Ramesh -
item Shouche, Yogesh -

Submitted to: Medical and Veterinary Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 18, 2013
Publication Date: May 7, 2014
Citation: Gupta, A.K., Rastogi, G., Nayduch, D., Bhonde, R.R., Shouche, Y.S. 2014. Molecular phylogenetic profiling of gut-associated bacteria in larvae and adults of flesh flies (Sarcophaga spp.). Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Available: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24805263.

Interpretive Summary: Flesh flies breed in decaying matter such as carcasses and rotting flesh. In these environments they are in contact with both pathogenic and non pathogenic microbes. Flesh flies also associate with humans and other animals and therefore are important in harboring and disseminating bacteria from septic to domestic habitats. This study aimed to characterize the diversity of bacteria species associated with both larvae and adult flesh flies using both a culture-based and culture-independent (molecular) approach. Bacteria cultured from larva and adult flesh fly guts belonged to the genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Budvicia, Citrobacter, Dermacoccus, Enterococcus, Ignatzschineria, Lysinibacillus, Myroides, Pasteurella, Proteus, Providencia, and Staphylococcus. Molecular approaches identified bacteria in the genera Aeromonas, Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, Citrobacter, Clostridium, Corynebacterium, Ignatzschineria, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Propionibacterium, Proteus, Providencia, Serratia, Sporosarcina, Weissella, and Wohlfahrtiimonas. Many species within these genera are pathogens to humans and animals, thus bolstering the assessment of microbiological risk associated with the presence of these flies. This study establishes a platform for a much larger study that will assess microbial diversity in flesh flies from a wider geographic area and other environments.

Technical Abstract: Flesh flies are carrion-breeding, necrophagous insects important in medical and veterinary entomology as potential transmitters of pathogens to humans and animals. Our aim was to analyze the diversity of gut associated bacteria in wild-caught larva and adult flesh flies using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. 16S rRNA gene sequences from cultured isolates and clone libraries revealed bacteria affiliated to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes in the guts of larva and adult flesh flies. Bacteria cultured from larva and adult flesh fly guts belonged to the genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Budvicia, Citrobacter, Dermacoccus, Enterococcus, Ignatzschineria, Lysinibacillus, Myroides, Pasteurella, Proteus, Providencia, and Staphylococcus. Phylogenetic analysis showed clone sequences of the genera Aeromonas, Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, Citrobacter, Clostridium, Corynebacterium, Ignatzschineria, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Propionibacterium, Proteus, Providencia, Serratia, Sporosarcina, Weissella, and Wohlfahrtiimonas. Members belonging to clinically significant genera such as Ignatzschineria and Wohlfahrtiimonas were detected in both larvae and adult flesh flies. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries supported culture-based results while revealing the presence of additional bacterial taxa. This study determined the diversity of gut microbiota of the flesh flies, which will bolster the ability to assess microbiological risk associated with the presence of these flies and thereby establishes a platform for a much larger study.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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