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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND UTILIZATION OF BIOACTIVE COMPONENTS FROM NEW CROPS AND AGRICULTURAL CO-PRODUCTS

Location: Functional Foods Research Unit

Title: Saponins from soy and chickpea: stability during beadmaking and in vitro bioaccessibility

Authors
item Serventi, Luca -
item Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn -
item Riedl, Ken -
item Kerem, Zohar -
item Berhow, Mark
item Vodovotz, Yael -
item Schwartz, Steven -
item Failla, Mark -

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 16, 2013
Publication Date: June 16, 2013
Citation: Serventi, L., Chitchumroonchokchai, C., Riedl, K.M., Kerem, Z., Berhow, M.A., Vodovotz, Y., Schwartz, S.J., Failla, M.L. 2013. Saponins from soy and chickpea: stability during beadmaking and in vitro bioaccessibility. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 61:6703-6710.

Interpretive Summary: This study investigated the stability of saponins, a phytochemical compopent found in soy and chickpea during the making and simulated digestion of soy and soy-chickpea breads and then evaluated in what form these saponins were available to be absorbed in digested breads. The four forms of saponins normally found in foods were characterized in cooked and digested breads, and shown to generally converted from the form found in raw soy and chickpea to a hydrolyzed form found in most processed foods. These findings suggest that saponin structure and food matrix affect the stability of saponins during processing and digestion and that uptake of saponins by enterocyte-like cells is poor despite moderate apparent bioaccessibility.

Technical Abstract: This study investigated the stability of saponins during the making and simulated digestion of soy and soy-chickpea breads and the bioaccessibility of saponins in digested breads. Recovery of saponins in soy bread exceeded that in soy-chickpea breads, and recovery of type A and B saponins was greater than for type E and DDMP saponins. Simulated digestion of breads resulted in greater relative losses of type A and DDMP saponins than type B and E saponins due in part to conversion of DDMP. Bioaccessibility of type B, E, and DDMP saponins in aqueous fraction of chyme exceeded 50%, but was ~30% for type A saponins. Caco-2 cells accumulated 0.8-2.8% of saponins from apical compartment containing diluted aqueous fraction of chyme. These findings suggest that saponin structure and food matrix affect the stability of saponins during processing and digestion and that uptake of saponins by enterocyte-like cells is poor despite moderate apparent bioaccessibility.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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