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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Development of Strategies to Control Anaplasmosis

Location: Animal Diseases Research

Title: Cross-linking of anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge

Authors
item Noh, Susan
item Turse, Joushua -
item Brown, Wendy -
item Normine, Junzo -
item Palmer, Guy -

Submitted to: Vaccine
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 19, 2013
Publication Date: February 27, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56524
Citation: Noh, S.M., Turse, J., Brown, W.C., Normine, J., Palmer, G.H. 2013. Cross-linking of anaplasma marginale outer membrane proteins enhances immunogenicity, but is not required for protection from challenge. Vaccine. Clin.Vacc.Immun. 2013. 20(5):651-656.

Interpretive Summary: Anaplasmosis, caused by Anaplasma marginale, is a tick transmitted disease of cattle, which is characterized by severe anemia, fever, and weight loss, and is a production-limiting disease. The methods currently available to control anaplasmosis are inadequate and rely on tick control and treatment of infected animals, both of which are difficult in extensive rearing conditions. Encouragingly, a well-defined group of outer membrane proteins induces protective immunity in cattle. However, both the specific antigenic components as well as the format in which those antigens are presented to the bovine immune system need to be determined in order to develop an economically viable vaccine. This research addresses the later knowledge gap, the vaccine format. It was determined that the proteins components of the vaccine do not need to be linked together to induce a protective immune response. This greatly simplifies vaccine formulation and testing.

Technical Abstract: Bacterial outer membrane proteins are the primary targets of a protective immune response. The specific characteristics of outer membrane-based immunogens, in terms of antigen content and context that are required for protective immunity remain unknown for a wide variety of bacterial pathogens. Using Anaplasma marginale as a model, we determined that maintaining a close physical association between the members of a protective outer membrane protein complex enhanced immunogenicity, but was not necessary for protection from challenge.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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