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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MOLECULAR, CELLULAR, AND REGULATORY ASPECTS OF NUTRITIONAL METABOLISM DURING CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Sedentary behavior and physical activity in youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes

Authors
item Kriska, Andrea -
item Delahanty, Linda -
item Edelstein, Sharon -
item Amodei, Nancy -
item Chadwick, Jennifer -
item Copeland, Kenneth -
item Galvin, Bryan -
item El Ghormli, Laure -
item Haymond, Morey -
item Kelsey, Megan -
item Lassiter, Chad -
item Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth -
item Milaszewski, Kerry -
item Syme, Amy -

Submitted to: Pediatrics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 5, 2012
Publication Date: March 1, 2013
Citation: Kriska, A., Delahanty, L., Edelstein, S., Amodei, N., Chadwick, J., Copeland, K., Galvin, B., El Ghormli, L., Haymond, M., Kelsey, M., Lassiter, C., Mayer-Davis, E., Milaszewski, K., Syme, A. 2013. Sedentary behavior and physical activity in youth with recent onset of type 2 diabetes. Pediatrics. 131(3):e850-e856.

Interpretive Summary: This was a study involving a large number of children with type 2 diabetes (TODAY trial). Subjects' activity was measured using a device call an accelerometer to objectively measure their physical activity. Data collected from these subjects were compared to an equally obese population of adolescents studied in an identical way from the NHANES database. We observed that when compared to the obese group of children from an NHANES cohort, our adolecents with type 2 dibetes were less physically active and spent more time in a sedentary state than the control group. Thus, treatment efforts in adolescents with type 2 diabetes should include decreasing sitting along with efforts to increase their physical activity.

Technical Abstract: With the rise of type 2 diabetes in youth, it is critical to investigate factors such as physical activity (PA) and time spent sedentary that may be contributing to this public health problem. This article describes PA and sedentary time in a large cohort of youth with type 2 diabetes and compares these levels with other large-scale investigations. The Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) trial is a study in 699 youth, recruited from 15 US clinical centers, aged 10 to 17 years with <2 years of type 2 diabetes and a BMI >/= 85th percentile. In comparison with the subset of the NHANES cohort who were obese (BMI >/= 95th percentile), TODAY youth spent significantly more time being sedentary (difference averaging 56 minutes per day; P < .001) as assessed by accelerometry. Although moderate to vigorous activity levels in both obese cohorts for all age groups were exceptionally low, younger TODAY boys were still significantly less active than similarly aged NHANES youth. Comparisons between the TODAY girls and other investigations suggest that the TODAY girls also had relatively lower PA and fitness levels. Adolescents with type 2 diabetes from the large TODAY cohort appear to be less physically active and tend to spend more time being sedentary than similarly aged youth without diabetes identified from other large national investigations. Treatment efforts in adolescents with type 2 diabetes should include decreasing sitting along with efforts to increase PA levels.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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