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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Metabolomic and genomic profiling of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid effects on muscle metabolism in mice fed a high fat diet

Authors
item Aljawadi, Arwa -
item Lemieux, Monique -
item Kalupahana, Nishan -
item Siriwardhana, Nalin -
item Claycombe, Kate
item Moustaid-Moussa, Naima -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 5, 2012
Publication Date: April 9, 2013
Citation: Aljawadi, A., Lemieux, M., Kalupahana, N.S., Siriwardhana, N., Claycombe, K.J., Moustaid-Moussa, N. 2013. Metabolomic and genomic profiling of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid effects on muscle metabolism in mice fed a high fat diet. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 27:lb319.

Technical Abstract: We previously reported that feeding mice high-fat (HF) diets enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation, adiposity and insulin resistance. In the current study, we used skeletal muscle from mice fed HF or HF-EPA for 11 weeks to further dissect mechanisms mediating EPA effects on soleus muscle metabolism that may be responsible for improved insulin resistance and inflammation. We conducted metabolomic, energetic, gene and protein expression studies to determine global metabolic changes in this tissue. Our analyses showed that fatty acid and amino acid profiles were altered by the EPA diet. Both saturated fatty acids and docosahexaenoate (DHA) were elevated in muscle from the EPA group. Furthermore, essential amino acids for muscle protein synthesis and growth, namely branched chain amino acids BCAAs) increased by the EPA diet. Surprisingly, we did not observe any significant changes in fatty acid oxidation between HF and HF-EPA fed animals. These metabolomics findings were consistent with analyses of expression of lipid metabolizing genes in these muscles. From these data, we conclude that HF diets rich in EPA increased synthesis of both muscle fatty acid and essential amino acids but did not improve fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. Further studies are needed to dissect the role of muscle metabolism in improving diet-induced obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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