Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY, NUTRITION AND PROBLEMS OF AGING

Location: Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Title: Meta-analysis of interaction between dietary magnesium intake and genetic risk variants on diabetes phenotypes in the charge consortium

Authors
item Hruby, Adela -
item Ngwa, Julius -
item Meigs, James -
item Nettleton, Jennifer -
item Mckeown, Nicola -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 13, 2012
Publication Date: March 29, 2012
Citation: Hruby, A., Ngwa, J.S., Meigs, J.B., Nettleton, J.A., Mckeown, N.M. 2012. Meta-analysis of interaction between dietary magnesium intake and genetic risk variants on diabetes phenotypes in the charge consortium. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 26:243.1.

Technical Abstract: Little is known about whether genetic variation modifies the effect of magnesium (Mg) intake on two important diabetes risk factors: fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI). We examined interactions between dietary Mg and genetic variants associated with glucose (16 SNPs), insulin (2 SNPs), or Mg homeostasis and transport (8SNPs), on FG or FI. Fifteen cohorts provided dietary, genetic, FG (mmol/L), and FI (pmol/L, ln-transformed) data on up to 52,170 participants without diabetes. Analyses included: associations of Mg with FG or FI; associations of SNPs with FG or FI; and interactions between Mg and each SNP on FG or FI. Cohort-level results adjusted for age, sex, energy intake, study center, and population substructure were meta-analyzed using inverse variance-weighted, fixed-effect methods. Statistical significance was alpha=0.0015 (Bonferroni correction for 34 tests). FG (beta: -0.012 mmol/L; 95%CI: -0.015, -0.008) and FI (-2.4% or beta: -0.024 lnpmol/ L; 95%CI -0.027, -0.020) were lower per 50 mg/day greater intake of Mg. No interaction was observed (p=0.0198–0.9364). Consistent with other studies, higher Mg intake associated with lower FG and FI. There was no evidence that genetic variants at these loci influence the association between dietary Mg and FG or FI.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page