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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUNFLOWER GERMPLASM DIVERSIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION UTILIZING WILD SUNFLOWER SPECIES, CYTOGENETICS, AND APPLIED GENOMICS

Location: Sunflower Research

Title: Transmission of Switchgrass mosaic virus by Graminella aureovitatta

Authors
item Agindotan, Bright -
item Prasifka, Jarrad
item Gray, Michael -
item Dietrich, Christopher -
item Bradley, Carl -

Submitted to: Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 27, 2013
Publication Date: July 29, 2013
Citation: Agindotan, B.O., Prasifka, J.R., Gray, M.E., Dietrich, C.H., Bradley, C.A. 2013. Transmission of Switchgrass mosaic virus by Graminella aureovitatta. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology. 35(3):384-389.

Interpretive Summary: Switchgrass mosaic virus was identified in switchgrass and was proposed as a new marafivirus based on its genome sequence and comparison with its closest relative, Maize rayado fino virus, a type member of the genus, Marafivirus. Maize rayado fino virus only infects corn and its wild relatives, and is naturally transmitted by the corn leafhopper. One of the criteria established by the International Committee for Virus Taxonomy for speciation of members of genus Marafivirus is vector specificity. Therefore, proving that Switchgrass mosaic virus is transmitted by a different species other than corn leafhopper would provide additional evidence that Switchgrass mosaic virus is a new species. In 2010, three leafhopper species were identified in switchgrass fields near Champaign, Illinois. Switchgrass mosaic virus was detected by RT-PCR in over 95% of the specimens. Of the three leafhoppers, only Graminella aureovitatta transmitted the virus to ‘Cave in Rock’ switchgass plants in a growth chamber. Transmission efficiency was 80% but only one of the eight infected plants displayed mosaic (yellow streak) symptoms. Switchgrass mosaic virus was detected in over 75% of switchgrass plants (n=50) in two fields from which the leafhoppers were collected. This information is important to scientists and growers working on the production and development of switchgrass as an alternative crop.

Technical Abstract: Switchgrass mosaic virus (SwMV) was identified in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and was proposed as a new marafivirus based on its genome sequence and comparison with its closest relative, Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), a type member of the genus, Marafivirus. MRFV only infects maize (Zea mays) and its wild relatives, and naturally transmitted by a corn leafhopper, Dalbulus maidis. One of the criteria established by the International Committee for Virus Taxonomy (ICTV) for speciation of members of genus, Marafivirus, is vector specificity. Therefore, proving that SwMV is transmitted by a different species of leafhopper than D. maidis would provide additional evidence that SwMV is a new species of the genus, Marafivirus. In 2010, three leafhopper species were identified in switchgrass fields near Champaign, Illinois: Graminella aureovitatta, Graminella mohri, and Flexamia atlantica. Switchgrass mosaic virus was detected by RT-PCR in 100% of G. mohri and F. atlantica, and 95% of G. aureovitatta. Twenty specimens of each species were evaluated. Of the three leafhoppers, only G. aureovitatta transmitted the virus to ‘Cave in Rock’ switchgass plants in a growth chamber. Transmission efficiency was 80% (n=10) and only one of the eight SwMV-infected plants displayed mosaic (yellow streak) symptoms. Switchgrass mosaic virus was detected in 78% and 83% of different switchgrass plants (n=50) in two fields from which the leafhoppers were collected.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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