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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENERGY REGULATION DURING THE ADULT LIFESPAN

Location: Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Title: Urinary sugars (sucrose and fructose) associations with self-reported sugars intake: the influence of plausibility of reported energy intake

Authors
item Sharma, Rashmi -
item Roberts, Susan -
item Polissar, Nayak -
item Boushey, Carol -
item Maroney, Owen -
item Fieselmann, Krista -
item Ebner, Rachel -
item Fuss, Paul -
item Mccrory, Megan -

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 13, 2012
Publication Date: March 29, 2012
Citation: Sharma, R.S., Roberts, S.B., Polissar, N.L., Boushey, C., Maroney, O.H., Fieselmann, K.N., Ebner, R.E., Fuss, P., Mccrory, M.A. 2012. Urinary sugars (sucrose and fructose) associations with self-reported sugars intake: the influence of plausibility of reported energy intake [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 26:1004.10.

Technical Abstract: Urinary sucrose and fructose may serve as biomarkers of sugars intake, the latter which are thought to be underreported in dietary assessment. We examined associations of urinary sugars with reported sugars intake in adults recruited for a study on diet and chronic disease risk. Methods: Healthy, nonsmoking, weight-stable adults (n=76) performed 3x24h urine collections (UC) and completed 3 multiple pass 24h dietary recalls over 10d. Results are shown for those (n=67; aged 18-58y, BMI 19-36kg/m2) who had a greater than or equal to 1 complete UC (urinary PABA recovery is greater than or equal to 85%). Urinary sugars were measured by an enzymatic kit (Roche) and mean daily amounts calculated. 3d mean intakes of sucrose, fructose and added sugars were computed with Nutrition Data System for Research (v.10/11). Plausible (n=52) and implausible EI reporters (n=15) were determined (Huang et al, 2005). Results: Mean (+/-SEM) urinary sucrose and fructose were 28+/-2 and 38+/-4 mg/d, respectively. Reported intakes were 56+/-5 (sucrose), 25+/-2 (fructose), and 84+/-7 (added) g/d. Urinary sucrose was significantly associated with dietary sucrose in the plausible sample (r=0.36; p=0.008) and non-significantly in the total sample (r=0.19; p=0.12). A similar pattern was seen for urinary sucrose and added sugars intake. Urinary fructose and sugars intake were not significantly associated. Conclusion: These data provide strong evidence that foods containing sucrose and added sugars are underreported.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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