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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: ENERGY INTAKE AND BODY COMPOSITION ASSESSMENT IN THE ELDERLY

Location: Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging

Title: Bone mineral density in elite adolescent female figure skaters

Authors
item Prelack, Kathy -
item Dwyer, Johana -
item Zeigler, Paula -
item Kehayias, Joseph -

Submitted to: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2012 (JISSN)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 2012
Publication Date: December 27, 2012
Citation: Prelack, K., Dwyer, J., Zeigler, P., Kehayias, J. 2012. Bone Mineral Density in Elite Adolescent female figure skaters. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2012 (JISSN). DOI: 10.1186/1550-2783-9-57.

Interpretive Summary: Elite female adolescent figure skaters must accommodate both the physical demands of competitive training and the accelerated rate of bone growth that is associated with adolescence. Although, these athletes apparently have sufficient physical activity to develop healthy bones, it is possible that other factors such as very low fat mass can compromise the growth and strength of bones. We studied differences in total and regional bone density among 36 nationally ranked skaters among 3 skater disciplines: single, pairs, and dancers. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using a modern x-ray method called dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. After controlling for their diet, calcium and vitamin D intake, we found a significant relationship between skater discipline and BMD, with single skaters having greater BMD in the total body, legs and pelvis. Pair skaters had greater pelvic BMD than ice dancers. Single and pair skaters have greater BMD than ice dancers. The bone building effect of physical training is most apparent in single skaters, particularly in the bone loading sites of the leg and pelvis.

Technical Abstract: Elite adolescent figure skaters must accommodate both the physical demands of competitive training and the accelerated rate of bone growth that is associated with adolescence. Although, these athletes apparently undergo sufficient physical activity to develop healthy bones, it is possible that other factors such as low fat mass can compromise the growth and strength of bones. We studied differences in total and regional bone density among 36 nationally ranked skaters among 3 skater disciplines: single, pairs, and dancers. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using a modern X-ray method called dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The skaters had a mean body % fat of 19.2+/- 5.8. After controlling for their diet, calcium and vitamin D intake, we found a significant relationship between skater discipline and BMD, with single skaters having greater BMD in the total body, legs and pelvis. Pair skaters had greater pelvic BMD than ice dancers. Single and pair skaters have greater BMD than ice dancers. The bone building effect of physical training is most apparent in single skaters, particularly in the bone loading sites if the leg and pelvis

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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