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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PLANT AND SOIL FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE BIOAVAILABILITY OF HEAVY METALS IN CROPS

Location: Crop Systems & Global Change

Title: Effect of flooding lead-arsenate contaminated orchard soil on growth, arsenic and lead accumulation in rice

Author
item CODLING, ETON

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2013
Publication Date: June 16, 2013
Citation: Codling, E.E. 2013. Effect of flooding lead-arsenate contaminated orchard soil on growth, arsenic and lead accumulation in rice. Meeting Abstract. pp. 450.

Technical Abstract: Lead-arsenate has been used as a pesticide in controlling codling moth (Cydia pomonella) in apple and plum orchards from 1900-1960. As a result, many old orchards contain high levels of arsenic. Flooding soils contaminated by lead-arsenate could increase plant arsenic and lead and become a human health risk. The objective was to determine the effects of flooding of lead-arsenate soils on rice grain yield, arsenic and lead accumulation. Two orchard soils Bagstown and Chashmont soils with high levels of arsenic and lead were planted with rice in the greenhouse under flooded and non-flooded conditions. Flooding reduced grain yield and increased grain arsenic concentration on both soils. Grain lead decreased with flooding for the Bagstown soil but increased for the Chashmont. Arsenic and lead concentrations in the straw were higher than grain. Grain arsenic and lead levels observed is not expected to become a human health risk. The higher arsenic and lead concentration in the straw may indirectly become a human health risk because rice straw is used for livestock feed and bedding. However, bioavailability studies are needed to determine if the arsenic and lead in rice grain and straw are bioavailable when consumed.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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