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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DELTA OBESITY PREVENTION RESEARCH PROGRAM Title: Utilizing the RE-AIM Framework in formative evaluation and program planning for a healthy food choice intervention in the Lower Mississippi Delta

Authors
item Hare, Constance -
item Zoeliner, Jamie -
item Crook, Lashaundrea -
item Connell, Carol -
item Yadrick, M -

Submitted to: Journal of American Dietetic Association
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2012
Publication Date: September 1, 2012
Citation: Hare, C.M., Zoeliner, J., Crook, L., Connell, C.L., Yadrick, M.K. 2012. Utilizing the RE-AIM Framework in formative evaluation and program planning for a healthy food choice intervention in the Lower Mississippi Delta [abstract]. Journal of American Dietetic Association. 112(9):A80.

Technical Abstract: A robust approach to program planning is needed for the development and execution of effective and sustainable behavioral interventions with large public health impact. The purpose of this formative research was to apply dimensions of the RE-AIM (i.e., Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) framework to guide program planning for a theoretically guided obesity intervention aimed at promoting healthy food choices through women's clubs in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD). Five key informant interviews and four focus groups were conducted with women in the LMD belonging to sororities, junior auxiliaries, garden clubs, and social clubs. Recruitment occurred through internet searches, local business listings, personal contacts, and referrals. The RE-AIM dimensions guided development of 25 interview and focus group questions. Interviews and focus group discussions were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using an open coding method to develop broad themes. Major themes that emerged included providing information when recruiting organizations (Reach); Positive Health Outcomes as a result of the intervention (Effectiveness); and Organizational Support (Adoption) to initiate a program. Motivation and Time were cited as barriers to participation (Implementation), and Researcher Support and Funding were cited as necessary to continuing the program (Maintenance). Social Support and Electronic Communication Techniques were additional themes that were found important to the interpersonal and logistical planning aspects of the program. The results of the interviews and focus groups were used to develop an implementation plan promoting optimal reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance of a healthy food choice intervention in the LMD.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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