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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPACT OF EARLY DIETARY FACTORS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH Title: Maternal high fat diet promotion of mammary tumor risk in adult progeny is associated with early expansion of mammary cancer stem-like cells and increased maternal oxidative environment

Authors
item Montales, Maria Theresa -
item Melnyk, Stephen -
item Simmen, Rosalia -

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 13, 2013
Publication Date: April 15, 2013
Citation: Montales, M., Melnyk, S., Simmen, R.C. 2013. Maternal high fat diet promotion of mammary tumor risk in adult progeny is associated with early expansion of mammary cancer stem-like cells and increased maternal oxidative environment [abstract]. FASEB Journal. 27(Meeting Abstracts):235.2.

Technical Abstract: Many adult chronic diseases might be programmed during early life by maternal nutritional history. Here, we evaluated effects of maternal high fat diet on mammary gland development and tumor formation in adult progeny. Female Wnt-1 transgenic mice exposed to high fat (HFD, 45% kcal fat) or control Casein (CAS, 17% kcal fat) diets in utero and during lactation were weaned to CAS diet at postnatal day 21 (PND 21). Relative to the CAS group, offspring exposed to maternal HFD had higher body and mammary tissue weights and elevated blood sugar and serum insulin levels at weaning and at PND110 and greater terminal end bud numbers at PND30. Mammary expression of tumor suppressors PTEN and p53 and pro-apoptosis Bcl-2 genes were lower in progeny exposed to maternal HFD. Mammary tumor latency was also lower (P=.01)in HFD (115+/-21 d) than CAS (190+/-13 d) offspring, but tumor incidence and growth did not differ between groups. Epithelial cells from pre-neoplastic mammary tissues showed expansion of the CD29highCD24+ (basal) and Thy1+CD29highCD24+ (cancer stem cell) subpopulations with maternal HFD exposure. Dams exposed to HFD had lower serum glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and cysteine (cysteine/cystine) oxidative ratios than CAS dams at weaning, but the two groups did not differ in body weights and insulin levels. Thus, maternal high fat diet, by altering early mammary development, may constitute a major risk factor for adult breast cancer.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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