Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: FOOD FACTORS AND MAINTENANCE OF BODY WEIGHT AND HEALTH Title: A standardized method for preparation of potatoes and analysis of their resistant starch content: Variation by cooking method and service temperature

Authors
item Jackson, Matthew
item Idso, Laura
item Combs, Gerald
item Beals, Katherine -
item Raatz, Susan

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 3, 2012
Publication Date: April 9, 2013
Citation: Jackson, M.I., Idso, L.A., Combs, G.F., Beals, K., Raatz, S.K. 2013. A standardized method for preparation of potatoes and analysis of their resistant starch content: Variation by cooking method and service temperature. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 27:1074.2.

Technical Abstract: Consumption of resistant starch (RS) may lead to reduced glycemia, improved satiety, and beneficial changes in gut microbiota due to its unique digestive and absorptive properties. We developed a standardized protocol for preparation of potatoes in order to assess their RS content and modified a commercially available assay for RS to incorporate microscale, high-throughput processing, quantitative standard curves for amylose and amylopectin and inclusion of a bacteriostatic agent to prevent alteration of carbohydrate profile by microbial contamination. We examined 3 North Dakota potato (Yukon Gold, Red Norland and Russet Burbank) varieties subjected to two methods of preparation (baking at 167 deg C for 65-80 minutes or boiling at 100 deg C for 10-11 minutes until tender) and at three service temperatures (hot, 60 deg C; chilled 4 deg C for 6 days and chilled followed by reheating to 60 deg C). RS was analyzed by 3-way ANOVA. Results show that the RS (g/100g) composition varied by method of preparation (p < 0.0001) and service temperature (p < 0.0001) but not variety (p > 0.05). Baked preparations of potatoes had higher RS content than boiled preparations, and hot potatoes had less RS than either chilled or reheated potatoes. Knowledge regarding the effects of preparation methods on the RS content of potato products may assist in dietary decision making. Work was supported by USDA 5450-51000-049-00D and the U.S. Potato Board.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014