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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED DRAINAGE WATER & AGRONOMIC MGMT STRATEGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION & SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION IN THE MIDWEST U.S.

Location: Soil Drainage Research

Title: Proximal soil sensing: global perspective

Authors
item Adamchuk, Viacheslav -
item Allred, Barry
item Viscarra Rossel, Raphael -

Submitted to: Fast Times: News for the Near Surface Geophysical Sciences
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 31, 2012
Publication Date: April 30, 2012
Citation: Adamchuk, V.I., Allred, B.J., Viscarra Rossel, R.A. 2012. Proximal soil sensing: global perspective. Fast Times: News for the Near Surface Geophysical Sciences. 17(1):13-16.

Interpretive Summary: As a result of a number of naturally occurring processes and cultural practices, the characteristics of soils demonstrate substantial spatial heterogeneity that affects current land use. from infrastructure development to agriculture, spatial variability in soils must be taken into account in order to optimize on-going practices. To better understand this variability, remote and proximal soil sensing techniques have been developed. Although there are similarities, the two approaches provide different technical capabilities to obtain georeferenced data on many soil parameters at different scales and times. While remote sensing is based on airborne and satellite platforms, Proximal Soil Sensing (PSS) is a set of technologies developed to measure the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil when placing the sensor in contact with, or at a proximal distance (less than 2 m) to, the soil being characterized. Unlike benchtop equipment, PSS instruments allow for a relatively large number of measurements to be obtained rapidly and at a relatively low cost. This article summarizes the PSS instruments presently being tested and provides insight on their potential applications.

Technical Abstract: As a result of a number of naturally occurring processes and cultural practices, the characteristics of soils demonstrate substantial spatial heterogeneity that affects current land use. From infrastructure development to agriculture, spatial variability in soils must be taken into account in order to optimize on-going practices. To better understand this variability, remote and proximal soil sensing techniques have been developed. Although there are similarities, the two approaches provide different technical capabilities to obtain georeferenced data on many soil parameters at different scales and times. While remote sensing is based on airborne and satellite platforms, Proximal Soil Sensing (PSS) is a set of technologies developed to measure the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil when placing the sensor in contact with, or at a proximal distance (less than 2 m) to, the soil being characterized. Unlike benchtop equipment, PSS instruments allow for a relatively large number of measurements to be obtained rapidly and at a relatively low cost. This article summarizes the PSS instruments presently being tested and provides insight on their potential applications.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014