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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF A DECISION-SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR THE ECOLOGICALLY-BASED MANAGEMENT OF CHEATGRASS- AND MEDUSAHEAD-INFESTED RANGELAND

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

Title: Ecologically-based invasive plant management: Step by step

Authors
item Sheley, Roger
item Smith, Brenda

Submitted to: Rangelands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 2, 2012
Publication Date: December 1, 2012
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56003
Citation: Sheley, R.L., Smith, B.S. 2012. Ecologically-based invasive plant management: Step by step. Rangelands. 34(6):6-10.

Interpretive Summary: Invasive plants on rangelands throughout the west continue to expand creating wildfire hazards, negatively affecting wildlife habitat and livestock production. In this paper we outline the science based decision framework, ecologically-based invasive plant management (EBIPM). EBIPM is a step by step process for land manager to develop integrated strategies to address the true causes of invasive plants. As EBIPM is adopted by more land managers, western rangelands may be protected and restored from invasive species.

Technical Abstract: Providing land managers with a framework from which to make informed decisions as to the causes of invasive plant infestations has been undeveloped for many years. Understanding the actual ecological causes of these infestations is the basis for ecologically-based invasive plant management (EBIPM) program. Designed in a step by step process, EBIPM allows managers to assess the land with special attention to recognizing ecological processes that may be in disrepair, then link ecological principles to choose the best options for integrating tools and strategies, finally they can use adaptive management to evaluate the effect of treatments and change management if needed. Having a framework to assist land managers will lead to more effective management of difficult invasive plants.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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