Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTERVENTION STRATEGIES TO SUPPORT THE GLOBAL CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS (FMDV)

Location: Foreign Animal Disease Research

Title: Heterogeneity in the antibody response to foot-and-mouth disease primo-vaccinated calves

Authors
item Di Giacomo, Sebastian -
item Brito, Barbara -
item Perez, Andres -
item Bucafusco, Danilo -
item Pega, Juan -
item Rodriguez, Luis
item Borca, Manuel
item Perez-Filgueira, Mariano -

Submitted to: Transboundary and Emerging Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 9, 2013
Publication Date: July 30, 2013
Citation: Di Giacomo, S., Brito, B.P., Perez, A.M., Bucafusco, D., Pega, J., Rodriguez, L.L., Borca, M.V., Perez-Filgueira, M. 2013. Heterogeneity in the antibody response to foot-and-mouth disease primo-vaccinated calves. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases. DOI:10.1111/tbed.12130.

Interpretive Summary: Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an economically important viral disease of cattle and presents a major constraint to international trade of livestock and associated products. FMD vaccines are routinely used as effective control tools in large regions worldwide and to limit outbreaks during epidemics. Protection in cattle largely relates to the ability of vaccination to induce antibodies that can neutralize the virus and prevent its spread. Although there have been reports of cattle responding differently to vaccination, few studies have been done to determine the influence of the animal genetic background on their ability to respond to vaccination. Here investigated if the level of antibody response to FMD vaccination in cattle of different genetic lineages was related to their genetic background (breed of the parental sire). The analysis of 377 previously unvaccinated cattle showed lower immune responses in steers derived from Jersey sires compared to those derived from Holstein sires. This information is important to take into account during the implementation of vaccination programs to control FMD.

Technical Abstract: Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the most economically important viral disease of wild and domesticated biungulate species and presents a major constraint to international trade of livestock and their associated products. FMD vaccines are routinely used as effective control tools in large regions worldwide and to limit outbreaks during epidemics. Commercial formulations include whole inactivated viral particles as vaccine antigens and protection in cattle has been largely correlated to the induction of neutralizing antibodies. Genetic control of cattle immune adaptive responses has been demonstrated for peptide antigens derived from FMD virus (FMDV) structural proteins. To date, no data has been published regarding the influence of genetics on specific responses to structurally complex FMDV antigens. The aim of this work was to study the association between the antibody response induced in steers after FMDV primary vaccination using commercial vaccines, and the sire’s breed as indicative of genetic-borne variation in the response.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page