Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: METABOLOMIC AND MICROBIAL PROFILING OF TROPICAL/SUBTROPICAL FRUITS AND SMALL FRUITS FOR QUALITY FACTORS AND MICROBIAL STABILITY

Location: Citrus and Other Subtropical Products Research

Title: A comparative study of ‘Fallglo’ and its seedless mutation ‘US Early Pride’ tangerines by sensory evaluation

Authors
item Biotteau, Alice -
item Leclair, Clotilde -
item PLOTTO, ANNE
item MCCOLLUM, THOMAS

Submitted to: Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 19, 2012
Publication Date: December 17, 2012
Citation: Biotteau, A., Leclair, C., Plotto, A., Mccollum, T.G. 2012. A comparative study of ‘Fallglo’ and its seedless mutation ‘US Early Pride’ tangerines by sensory evaluation. Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society. 125:272-275.

Interpretive Summary: ‘US Early Pride’ is a seedless tangerine mutation of ‘Falllo’. Both cultivars are very similar except for the number of seeds per fruit. There was no preference between ‘Fallglo’ and its seedless mutation ‘US Early Pride’ in a consumer taste panel. Panelists who preferred ‘Fallglo’ indicated it was because it was sweeter and had more tangerine flavor. Panelists who preferred ‘US Early Pride’ indicated it was because it had less seeds and it was juicier.

Technical Abstract: ‘Fallglo’ is an early-maturing tangerine hybrid commercially grown in Florida. It has high eating quality but contains many seeds, which is undesirable for consumers. ‘US Early Pride’, an irradiation-induced mutant of ‘Fallglo’, combines many quality attributes of ‘Fallglo’, but has very few seeds. ‘Fallglo’ and ‘US Early Pride’ from the same grove were compared in a consumer taste panel biweekly during the 2011-2012 harvest season (October to December). Fruit were washed, sanitized and peeled, and one half of each fruit (mixed segments) were presented to 55-60 untrained panelists over four sessions. The other half of each fruit was juiced and analyzed for soluble solids content (SSC) and titratable acidity (TA). Panelists were asked to taste the two samples and indicate which one they preferred and then to explain their choice in a follow up questionnaire. Results show that there was no preference overall between ‘Fallglo’ and ‘US Early Pride’ for any of the harvests. However, panelists who preferred ‘US Early Pride’ stated it was mostly because it had less seeds and it was juicier, while panelists who preferred ‘Fallglo’ indicated that it was because it was sweeter and had more tangerine flavor. Differences between cultivars for SSC and TA were only significant on the first harvest (Oct. 26), with ‘Fallglo’ having greater SSC and TA than ‘US Early Pride’. Differences in SSC/TA were seen on the second harvest (Nov. 3), with ‘Fallglo’ having greater SSC/TA than ‘US Early Pride’, and the BrimA index was greater for ‘Fallglo’ than ‘US Early Pride’ on the first, second and last harvests. Therefore, the BrimA index might be a better indicator for sweetness attribute than SSC/TA.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page