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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SUSTAINABLE FUELS AND CHEMICALS

Location: Renewable Product Technology Research Unit

Title: Improved lignocellulose conversion to biofuels with thermophilic bacteria and thermostable enzymes

Authors
item Bhalla, Aditya -
item Bansal, Namita -
item Kumar, Sudhir -
item BISCHOFF, KENNETH
item Sani, Rajesh -

Submitted to: Bioresource Technology
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: October 29, 2012
Publication Date: November 8, 2012
Citation: Bhalla, A., Bansal, N., Kumar, S., Bischoff, K.M., Sani, R. 2013. Improved lignocellulose conversion to biofuels with thermophilic bacteria and thermostable enzymes. Bioresource Technology. 128:751-759.

Technical Abstract: Second generation feedstock, especially nonfood lignocellulosic biomass, has been seen as a potential source for biofuel production. Cost intensive pretreatment operations, including physical, chemical, biological, and slow enzymatic hydrolysis, make the overall process of lignocellulosic conversion less economical. Lignocellulose conversion technologies, which are carried out at <= 50 degrees C, have several limitations. Therefore, this review focuses on the importance of thermophiles and thermostable enzymes to overcome the limitations of existing lignocellulosic biomass conversion processes. Thermophiles and thermostable lignocellulose-deconstructing enzymes are discussed here as potential candidates for successful and efficient lignocellulose conversion. Influence of high temperatures on various existing lignocellulose conversion processes and those that are under development including simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, separate hydrolysis and fermentation and extremophilic consolidated bioprocess are also discussed. The motivation of using thermophiles and thermostable enzymes is to develop a more efficient and cost effective lignocellulose bioconversion process. The overall process cycle of thermostable enzymes and thermolabile enzymes is compared for industrial scale operations.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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