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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Improved Control of Stripe Rust in Cereal Crops

Location: Wheat Genetics, Quality Physiology and Disease Research

Title: Genetic analysis of adult plant, quantitative resistance to stripe rust in wheat cultivar Stephens in multi-environment trials

Authors
item Vazquez, M. -
item Peterson, C. -
item Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar -
item Chen, Xianming
item Heesacker, Adam -
item Ammar, Karim -
item Crossa, Jose -
item Mundt, Christopher -

Submitted to: Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 4, 2011
Publication Date: September 13, 2011
Citation: Vazquez, M.D., Peterson, C.J., Riera-Lizarazu, O., Chen, X., Heesacker, A., Ammar, K., Crossa, J., Mundt, C.C. 2011. Genetic analysis of adult plant, quantitative resistance to stripe rust in wheat cultivar Stephens in multi-environment trials. Theoretical and Applied Genetics. 124:1-11.

Interpretive Summary: The wheat cultivar ‘Stephens’ has been grown commercially in the USA Pacific Northwest for 30 years. The durable resistance of ‘Stephens’ to stripe rust was believed to be due to a combination of seedling and adult plant resistance genes. Multilocation field trials, diversity array technology (DArT), and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance. Recombinant inbred lines were assessed for stripe rust response in eight locations/years, five in 2008 and three in 2009. The data from Mt. Vernon, WA, differed from all other environments, and composite interval mapping (CIM) identified three QTL, which accounted for 12, 11, and 6% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. CIM across the remaining six environments identified four main QTL. Two QTL were detected in five of six environments and explained 11 and 15% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. Two other QTL were detected across four and three of six environments, and explained 19 and 9% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The susceptible parent ‘Platte’ contributed two of the QTL with the remaining QTL originating from ‘Stephens’. For each environment, additional minor QTL were detected, each accounting for 6–10% of the phenotypic variance. Different QTL with moderate effects were identified in both ‘Stephens’ and ‘Platte’. Significant QTL x environment interactions were evident, suggesting that specificity to plant stage, pathogen genotype, and/or temperature was important.

Technical Abstract: The wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar ‘Stephens’ has been grown commercially in the USA Pacific Northwest for 30 years. The durable resistance of ‘Stephens’ to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) was believed to be due to a combination of seedling and adult plant resistance genes. Multilocation field trials, diversity array technology (DArT), and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance. Recombinant inbred lines were assessed for stripe rust response in eight locations/ years, five in 2008 and three in 2009. The data from Mt. Vernon, WA, differed from all other environments, and composite interval mapping (CIM) identified three QTL, QYrst.orr-1AL, QYrst.orr-4BS, and QYrpl.orr-6AL, which accounted for 12, 11, and 6% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. CIM across the remaining six environments identified four main QTL. Two QTL, QYrst.orr-2BS.2 and QYrst.orr-7AS, were detected in five of six environments and explained 11 and 15% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. Two other QTL, QYrst.orr-2AS and QYrpl.orr-4BL, were detected across four and three of six environments, and explained 19 and 9% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. The susceptible parent ‘Platte’ contributed QYrpl.orr-4BL and QYrpl.orr-6AL, with the remaining QTL originating from ‘Stephens’. For each environment, additional minor QTL were detected, each accounting for 6–10% of the phenotypic variance. Different QTL with moderate effects were identified in both ‘Stephens’ and ‘Platte’. Significant QTL x environment interactions were evident, suggesting that specificity to plant stage, pathogen genotype, and/or temperature was important.

Last Modified: 7/11/2014
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