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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ABSORPTION AND METABOLISM OF ESSENTIAL MINERAL NUTRIENTS IN CHILDREN Title: Investigating crosstalk between heat tolerance and redox status through suppressor screening of EMS mutagenized Arabidopsis monothioglutaredoxin GRXS17 mutants

Authors
item Garth, Jaleesa -
item Yang, Jian -
item Cheng, Ning-Hui -
item Murray, Debra -
item Hirschi, Kendal -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 28, 2012
Publication Date: May 16, 2012
Citation: Garth, J., Yang, J., Cheng, N., Murray, D., Hirschi, K.D. 2012. Investigating crosstalk between heat tolerance and redox status through suppressor screening of EMS mutagenized Arabidopsis monothioglutaredoxin GRXS17 mutants [abstract]. Proceedings of the 4th Pan American Plant Membrane Biology Workshop, May 16-20, 2012, Asilomar, California. p. 42.

Technical Abstract: Global environmental temperature changes threaten innumerable plant species. While various signaling networks regulate plant responses to heat stress (HS), the mechanisms unifying these diverse processes are largely unknown. The thioredoxin (Trx) and glutaredoxin (Grx) systems help control cellular redox potential. Previously we have demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Grx protein AtGRXS1 is involved in ROS signaling, auxin responses, and thermotolerance. Here we are looking for genetic suppressors to identify candidate genes involved in AtGRXS17 mediated heat tolerance. AtGRX17 knockout mutants grow poorly under elevated temperature conditions (28 degrees C) in comparison to wild type controls. For the suppressor screen, AtGRXS17 mutant seeds were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) to induce random mutations in the genome. The seeds of the F2 generation of the mutagenized AtGRXS17 seeds are grown in 28 degree C to screen for revertants that exhibit the wild type phenotype. These seeds were then planted and grown to maturity. Currently we have obtained F2 seeds from around 2000 individual EMS mutagenized M1 plants and are in the midst of the screen. Once revertants are identified, we will then cross the revertant lines to an alternative ecotype to map the mutation. The ultimate purpose of this project is to identify genes that interact with those regulated by AtGRXS17 involved in plants' thermotolerance response. This research will then allow us to adapt the knowledge we have about plant sensitivity to heat to increase the hardiness of food crops.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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