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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PROTECTION OF SUBTROPICAL AND TROPICAL AGRICULTURE COMMODITIES AND ORNAMENTALS FROM EXOTIC INSECTS Title: Wood and Chemistry – or How to Combine Bob Heath's Two Passions into Entomology Research

Authors
item Niogret, Jerome
item Epsky, Nancy
item Kendra, Paul

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 18, 2012
Publication Date: July 24, 2012
Citation: Niogret, J., Epsky, N.D., Kendra, P.E. 2012. Wood and Chemistry – or How to Combine Bob Heath's Two Passions into Entomology Research. Meeting Abstract. 2012 Annual Florida Entomological Society, July 25 - 28, 2012, Jupiter, FL.

Interpretive Summary: Plants generally produce complex mixtures of terpenoids that may differ greatly among species. Terpenoids, such C10 monoterpenes and C15 sesquiterpenes, are known to play an important role in the biology and ecology of plants, directly or indirectly influencing their interactions with their biotic environments. These plant chemicals are some of the primary cues used by insects to locate a preferred host tree or a specific location within a host tree. This presentation focuses on the study of volatile chemicals used as potential kairomones by males of the Mediterranean fruit fly and females of the redbay ambrosia beetle, using multidisciplinary approaches.

Technical Abstract: Plants generally produce complex mixtures of terpenoids that may differ greatly among species. Terpenoids, such C10 monoterpenes and C15 sesquiterpenes, are known to play an important role in the biology and ecology of plants, directly or indirectly influencing their interactions with their biotic environments. These plant chemicals are some of the primary cues used by insects to locate a preferred host tree or a specific location within a host tree. This presentation focuses on the study of volatile chemicals used as potential kairomones by males of the Mediterranean fruit fly and females of the redbay ambrosia beetle, using multidisciplinary approaches.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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