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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Groundnut ringspot virus and tomato spotted wilt virus – Tospoviruses in Florida

Authors
item Adkins, Scott
item Webster, Craig
item Mellinger, H -
item Frantz, Galen -
item Turechek, William
item Mcavoy, Eugene -
item Reitz, Stuart
item Funderburk, Joe -

Submitted to: Tomato Institute
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 9, 2012
Publication Date: September 5, 2012
Citation: Adkins, S.T., Webster, C.G., Mellinger, H.C., Frantz, G., Turechek, W., Mcavoy, E., Reitz, S.R., Funderburk, J. 2012. Groundnut ringspot virus and tomato spotted wilt virus – Tospoviruses in Florida. Tomato Institute. PRO 528:26-27.

Interpretive Summary: In late 2009-early 2010, groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) emerged in solanaceous vegetables in the Homestead area of Miami-Dade County in South Florida, extending the known distribution of this tospovirus beyond South America and South Africa. GRSV can infect tomato and other solanaceous vegetable crops at all stages of plant growth, and can lead to unmarketable fruits or plant death. GRSV is a relative of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), the original member of the tospovirus group of plant viruses. TSWV remains a serious economic limitation to the production of tomatoes, peppers and peanuts in the southeastern U.S. more than 20 years after its appearance. Although TSWV is well-known to Florida tomato producers, scouts, Extension personnel and scientists, GRSV has been relatively unknown until this first appearance in the U.S.

Technical Abstract: A growing number of solanaceous crop and weed species infected with groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) has been identified in Florida. Continuing geographic spread of GRSV into additional vegetable production areas of Florida has also been documented. Much has been learned about GRSV in Florida although many questions remain.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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