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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PROTECTION OF SUBTROPICAL AND TROPICAL AGRICULTURE COMMODITIES AND ORNAMENTALS FROM EXOTIC INSECTS

Location: Subtropical Horticulture Research

Title: Chemical ecology of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus)

Authors
item KENDRA, PAUL
item MONTGOMERY, WAYNE
item Niogret, Jerome
item Schnell, E -
item EPSKY, NANCY

Submitted to: Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 4, 2012
Publication Date: June 24, 2012
Citation: Kendra, P.E., Montgomery, W.S., Niogret, J., Schnell, E.Q., Epsky, N.D. 2012. Chemical ecology of the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus). Florida Entomological Society Annual Meeting. 5th annual meeting of the Florida Entomological society.

Interpretive Summary: The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is an exotic wood-boring pest first detected in the U.S. in 2002 near Savannah, Georgia. Females of X. glabratus vector a newly-described fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) that causes laurel wilt, a lethal disease of trees in the family Lauraceae. Laurel wilt has spread throughout the southeastern coastal plain, causing extensive mortality in native Persea species, including redbay (P. borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris). Currently, it poses an imminent threat to commercial avocado (P. americana) in south Florida, and with continued westward spread, will threaten avocado production in Mexico and California as well. This presentation summarizes field and laboratory research focused on identification of the semiochemicals used by X. glabratus for host location. An understanding of host-based attractants will facilitate development of improved lures for early pest detection and control.

Technical Abstract: The redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, is an exotic wood-boring pest first detected in the U.S. in 2002 near Savannah, Georgia. Females of X. glabratus vector a newly-described fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola) that causes laurel wilt, a lethal disease of trees in the family Lauraceae. Laurel wilt has spread throughout the southeastern coastal plain, causing extensive mortality in native Persea species, including redbay (P. borbonia) and swampbay (P. palustris). Currently, it poses an imminent threat to commercial avocado (P. americana) in south Florida, and with continued westward spread, will threaten avocado production in Mexico and California as well. This presentation summarizes field and laboratory research focused on identification of the semiochemicals used by X. glabratus for host location. An understanding of host-based attractants will facilitate development of improved lures for early pest detection and control.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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