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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIORATIONAL CONTROL METHODS FOR INSECT PESTS OF POTATO

Location: Fruit and Vegetable Insect Research

Title: Effect of mating on sex attraction in Bactericera cockerelli with evidence of refractoriness

Authors
item Guedot, Christelle -
item Horton, David
item Landolt, Peter
item Munyaneza, Joseph

Submitted to: Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 21, 2013
Publication Date: October 1, 2013
Citation: Guedot, C., Horton, D.R., Landolt, P.J., Munyaneza, J.E. 2013. Effect of mating on sex attraction in Bactericera cockerelli with evidence of refractoriness. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata. 149:27-35.

Interpretive Summary: The potato psyllid is a major pest of commercial potato causing millions of dollars in losses to potato producers and processors in numerous locations in the United States and Mexico. Scientists at the USDA-ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory examined the effect of mating on sex attraction. Mating induced a behavioral refractoriness during which males are not attracted to females. This refractory period lasts longer in females (at least 48 h) than males (less than 24 h). Following the post-mating refractory period, virgin males show a preference for virgin females, while mated females are as attractive as virgin females to mated males. This study contributes to a better understanding of the factors affecting sex attraction in the potato psyllid.

Technical Abstract: We investigated the effect of mating on female attractiveness and male responsiveness in the potato psyllid, Bactericera (= Paratrioza) cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), a major pest of potato. Mating induced a behavioral refractoriness during which males are not attracted to females. This refractory period lasts longer in females (at least 48 h) than males (less than 24 h). In mated females, the percent of females carrying spermatophores and the number of spermatophores per female decreased with the length of the female post-mating period, possibly due to the absorption by females of the spermatophores and their content. Following the post-mating refractory period, virgin males show a preference for virgin females, while mated females are as attractive as virgin females to mated males.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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