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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Is enhanced physical activity possible using active videogames?

Authors
item Baranowski, Tom -
item Baranowski, Janice -
item O'Connor, Teresia -
item Lu, Amy -
item Thompson, Deborah

Submitted to: The Games for Health Journal: Research, Development, and Clinical Applications
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 25, 2012
Publication Date: June 1, 2012
Citation: Baranowski, T., Baranowski, J., O'Connor, T., Lu, A.S., Thompson, D. 2012. Is enhanced physical activity possible using active videogames? The Games for Health Journal: Research, Development, and Clinical Applications. 1(3):228-232.

Interpretive Summary: We are facing a childhood obesity epidemic, and we are interested in how to increase physical activity in children. Active videogames offer a possible method. In our study, we compared the impact of active versus inactive video games. Children, 10-12 years of age, receiving two active Wii console video games were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive video games. This does not mean that active video games do not lead to physical activity. The conditions under which they lead to activity need to be clearly researched, and thus a larger scale study needs to be conducted.

Technical Abstract: Our research indicated that 10– to 12-year-old children receiving two active Wii (TM)(Nintendo (R); Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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