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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF SOYBEAN GENEOTYPES AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR EARLY SEASON AND STRESS ENVIRONMENTS

Location: Crop Genetics Research Unit

Title: Effects of chelating agents on protein, oil, fatty acid amd seed mineral concentrations in soybean

Authors
item Mudlagiri, Goli -
item Pande, Manju -
item Bellaloui, Nacer

Submitted to: Agricultural Sciences
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2012
Publication Date: June 22, 2012
Citation: Mudlagiri, G.B., Pande, M., Bellaloui, N. 2012. Effects of chelating agents on protein, oil, fatty acid amd seed mineral concentrations in soybean. Agricultural Sciences. 3(4)517-523.

Interpretive Summary: Iron is an essential nutrient for crop growth, yield, and quality. Iron deficiency leads to a common nutritional disorder called iron chlorosis, resulting in crop yield reduction and economic loss. Soils in the Early Soybean Production System in Mississippi Delta can be exposed to high soil moisture and poor aeration due to heavy rains or summer high temperatures and drought, leading to iron chlorosis and reduction in yield and seed quality. Iron chlorosis is corrected by applying commercial iron fertilizer to soil in the form of iron-chelating agent complex. A chelating agent is an organic compound that binds to iron to easily deliver it to the crop. Chelation, the process by which the organic compound binds to iron, has been used in agricultural production to correct iron deficiencies, especially where foliar application of iron fails to correct the deficiencies. Although effects of chelating agents on plant grow and nutrient deficiency remedies have been well established, their effect on seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and minerals) has not been well investigated. Therefore, the objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of various chelating agents on soybean seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and mineral concentrations. Three chelating agent (citric acid, disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and salicylic acid) were applied with and without iron to three-week-old soybean plants. After application, the plants were allowed to grow until harvest maturity under greenhouse conditions. The results showed that the chelating agents resulted in an increase of seed oleic acid from 13.0% to 33.5%. However, these chelating agents resulted in a decrease of linolenic acid from 17.8 to 31.0%. Some chelating agents resulted in increased protein from 2.9% to 3.4, and oil from 6.8% to 7.9%. Seed minerals such as iron, zinc, copper, boron, calcium, and potassium were also altered. The results indicated that chelating agents can alter seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and mineral concentrations. The increase or decrease of a given seed constituent (protein, oil, fatty acids, or minerals) depended on the type of the chelating agent. This research provides useful information on iron fertilizer management, iron-chelating agent selection, and seed quality.

Technical Abstract: Soybean seed is a major source of protein and oil for human diet. Since not much information is available on the effects of chelating agents on soybean seed composition constituents, the current study aimed to investigate the effects of various chelating agents on soybean [(Glycine max (L.) Merr.)] seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and mineral concentrations. Three chelating agent [citric acid (CA), disodium EDTA (DA), and salicylic acid (SA)] were applied separately or combined with ferrous (Fe++) ion (CA+Fe, EDTA+Fe, and SA+Fe) to three-week-old soybean plants. After application, the plants were allowed to grow until harvest maturity under greenhouse conditions. The results showed that CA, DA, SA, and Fe resulted in an increase of oleic acid from 13.0% to 33.5%. However, these treatments resulted in a decrease of linolenic acid from 17.8 to 31.0%. The treatments with CA and SA applications increased protein from 2.9% to 3.4%. The treatments DA + Fe and SA + Fe resulted in an increase in oil from 6.8% to 7.9%. Seed macro- and micro-elements were also altered. The results indicated that the CA, SA, DA, and Fe treatments can alter seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and mineral concentrations. Further studies are needed for conclusive results.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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