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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Dietary Guidelines Adherence and Healthy Body Weight Maintenance Title: Effects of a summer treatment program on functional sports outcomes in young children with ADHD

Authors
item O'Connor, Briannon -
item Fabiano, Gregory -
item Waschbusch, Daniel -
item Belin, Peter -
item Gnagy, Elizabeth -
item Pelham, William -
item Greiner, Andrew -
item Roemmich, James

Submitted to: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 23, 2013
Publication Date: August 1, 2014
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/59615
Citation: O'Connor, B.C., Fabiano, G.A., Waschbusch, D.A., Belin, P., Gnagy, E.M., Pelham, W.E., Greiner, A.R., Roemmich, J.N. 2014. Effects of a summer treatment program on functional sports outcomes in young children with ADHD. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 42:1005-1017.

Interpretive Summary: Participation in youth sports can be very beneficial, but children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may participate less often and less successfully. The current study evaluated functional sports outcomes for children with ADHD who attended a behavioral treatment that included practicing sport skills and playing sports. These children were compared to children with ADHD who did not attend the behavioral and sports program. The treatment resulted in improvements in many aspects of children’s sports functioning, including knowledge of game rules, in vivo game performance, and fundamental skill tasks (motor proficiency, ability to trap a soccer ball appropriately, reduce handball penalties in soccer, and catch a baseball). Parents also reported improved sports skills and good sportsmanship in the treatment group. These results suggest intensive behavioral intervention that includes sports training can significantly improve functional sports outcomes for young children with ADHD.

Technical Abstract: Participation in youth sports can be very beneficial, but children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may participate less often and less successfully. The current study evaluated functional sports outcomes for children with ADHD who attended an intensive behavioral treatment that included a sports training component, as compared to children with ADHD who did not attend the treatment. Results suggest that treatment resulted in significant improvements in many aspects of children’s sports functioning, including knowledge of game rules, in vivo game performance, and fundamental skill tasks (motor proficiency, ability to trap a soccer ball appropriately, reduce handball penalties in soccer, and catch a baseball). Parents also reported improved sports skills and good sportsmanship in the treatment group. No differences between groups were evident on additional skill tasks evaluating accurately kicking a soccer ball, throwing a baseball, or hitting a baseball off a tee. These results suggest intensive behavioral intervention that includes sports training can significantly improve functional sports outcomes for young children with ADHD.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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