Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MECHANISTIC PROCESS-LEVEL CROP SIMULATION MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS

Location: Crop Systems & Global Change

Title: Climate change in Asia and the Pacific: How can countries adapt?

Authors
item Anbumozhi, Venkatachalam
item Breiling, Meinhard
item Pathmarajah, Selvarajah
item Reddy, Vangimalla

Submitted to: Climate Change in Asia and the Pacific: How Can Countries Adapt
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 16, 2012
Publication Date: May 1, 2012
Citation: Anbumozhi, V., Breiling, M., Pathmarajah, S., Reddy, V. 2012. Climate change in Asia and the Pacific: How can countries adapt? New Delhi, India: Sage Publications. 400 p.

Interpretive Summary: The Asia Pacific (AP) region is more vulnerable to climate change risks than other regions, given its dependence on the natural resources and agricultural sector for economic development with densely populated coastal areas, weak institutions, and the poverty of a considerable proportion of its population. So, adaptation, i.e., making adjustments in natural or human systems in response to actual or predicted climate change or their effects which moderate negative or exploit beneficial opportunities becomes a key strategy for sustaining economic growth. Failure to adapt could stall development, particularly in countries that depend on natural resources. Adaptive capacity entails the ability to change behaviors, shift priorities, produce necessary goods and services, and to plan and respond in ways that will reduce harmful climate change impacts or transform them into no-regret economic opportunities. Climate Change in Asia and the Pacific: How Can Countries Adapt? Examines the framework conditions for integrating climate change adaptation measures into agriculture, water, and natural resources management activities. Based on the review of country experiences, the book describes key dimensions, suggests interventions for further exploration, and serves as a basis for planning and mainstreaming climate change adaptation into sectoral planning. This volume draws mainly on two workshops organized by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) in Tokyo from April 14 to 18, 2009, and in Colombo from June 8 to 11, 2010. These workshops focused on mainstreaming climate change adaptation considerations in development planning and gathered experts from academia, think tanks, public service organizations, the private sector, and international organizations. The basis of our analysis also comes from post-workshop surveys, updated literature from the field, as well as interviews and consultations with experts.

Technical Abstract: The Asia Pacific (AP) region is more vulnerable to climate change risks than other regions, given its dependence on the natural resources and agricultural sector for economic development with densely populated coastal areas, weak institutions, and the poverty of a considerable proportion of its population. So, adaptation, i.e., making adjustments in natural or human systems in response to actual or predicted climate change or their effects which moderate negative or exploit beneficial opportunities becomes a key strategy for sustaining economic growth. Failure to adapt could stall development, particularly in countries that depend on natural resources. Adaptive capacity entails the ability to change behaviors, shift priorities, produce necessary goods and services, and to plan and respond in ways that will reduce harmful climate change impacts or transform them into no-regret economic opportunities. Climate Change in Asia and the Pacific: How Can Countries Adapt? Examines the framework conditions for integrating climate change adaptation measures into agriculture, water, and natural resources management activities. Based on the review of country experiences, the book describes key dimensions, suggests interventions for further exploration, and serves as a basis for planning and mainstreaming climate change adaptation into sectoral planning. This volume draws mainly on two workshops organized by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI) in Tokyo from April 14 to 18, 2009, and in Colombo from June 8 to 11, 2010. These workshops focused on mainstreaming climate change adaptation considerations in development planning and gathered experts from academia, think tanks, public service organizations, the private sector, and international organizations. The basis of our analysis also comes from post-workshop surveys, updated literature from the field, as well as interviews and consultations with experts.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page