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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR INSECT PESTS OF ORCHARD CROPS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Field releases in Florida of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Diaphorina citri (Homoptera: Psyllidae) from mainland China

Authors
item Rohrig, Eric -
item Hall, David
item Stansly, P. -

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 30, 2012
Publication Date: April 25, 2012
Citation: Rohrig, E.A., Hall, D.G., Stansly, P.A. 2012. Field releases in Florida of Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an endoparasitoid of Diaphorina citri (Homoptera: Psyllidae) from mainland China. Florida Entomologist. 95(2):476-478.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid is a critically important citrus pest in the United States because it vectors the pathogen responsible for citrus greening disease (huanglongbing). The psyllid is attacked in Asia by a parasitoid named Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis, and it would be desirable to establish this natural enemy in the US for additional biological control of the psyllid. Despite releases of thousands of these parasitoids in numerous counties throughout the citrus growing regions of Florida, there is no evidence the parasitoid has established. A number of factors are thought to have contributed to this apparent failure. In light of these factors, further efforts to establish the parasitoid in Florida are warranted.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, is a critically important citrus pest in the United States because it vectors the pathogen responsible for citrus greening disease (huanglongbing). The psyllid is attacked in Asia by the encyrtid parasitoid Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis, and it would be desirable to establish this natural enemy in the United States for additional biological control of the psyllid. Despite releases of thousands of D. aligarhensis in 2000-2002 (Tawain population) and over 11,000 in 2007-2009 (mainland China population) in numerous counties throughout the citrus growing regions of Florida, D. aligarhenisis appears not to have established to date. Factors contributing to this apparent failure include intense pesticide use to control D. citri, low and variable populations of immature psyllids, competition with another parasitoid T. radiata (the two parasitoid species coexist in many parts of Asia), and predation of parasitized hosts by generalist predators. In light of these factors, further efforts to establish the parasitoid in Florida are warranted.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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