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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Sustainable Pest Management Strategies for Arid-land Crops

Location: Pest Management and Biocontrol Research

Title: Modeling resistance to juvenile hormone analogs: linking evolution, ecology and management

Authors
item Crowder, David -
item Ellsworth, Peter -
item Naranjo, Steven
item Tabashnik, Bruce -
item Carriere, Yves -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 17, 2012
Publication Date: May 1, 2013
Citation: Crowder, D., Ellsworth, P., Naranjo, S.E., Tabashnik, B., Carriere, Y. 2013. Modeling resistance to juvenile hormone analogs: linking evolution, ecology and management. In: Devillers, James, editor. Juvenile Hormones and Juvenoids. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. p. 99-126.

Interpretive Summary: Juvenile hormone analogs (JHAs) are insecticides that mimic insect juvenile hormone and interfere with normal insect development. JHAs disrupt a hormonal system that is specific to insects and thus kill some target pests while causing little or no harm to most non-target organisms. Because of their selectivity and efficacy, JHAs have become increasingly important in agriculture worldwide. Evolution of resistance by target pests, however, can reduce the effectiveness of JHAs. This chapter reviews how mathematical models have been used to analyze the evolution of pest resistance to JHAs and to develop strategies to delay pest resistance. We describe results of general mathematical models and a case study showing how simulation models, spatially explicit statistical models and other experimental data on pest dynamics, biological control and management have been applied to better understand and manage evolution of resistance to the JHA pyriproxyfen by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Modeling and experimental studies show how genetic, ecological, and human factors affect evolution of pest resistance to JHAs. Integrating knowledge of these factors into models can help to produce useful predictions about pest resistance to JHAs and to improve management strategies for preserving the effectiveness of this important class of insecticides.

Technical Abstract: Juvenile hormone analogs (JHAs) are insecticides that mimic insect juvenile hormone and interfere with normal insect development. JHAs disrupt a hormonal system that is specific to insects and thus kill some target pests while causing little or no harm to most non-target organisms. Because of their selectivity and efficacy, JHAs have become increasingly important in agriculture worldwide. Evolution of resistance by target pests, however, can reduce the effectiveness of JHAs. This chapter reviews how mathematical models have been used to analyze the evolution of pest resistance to JHAs and to develop strategies to delay pest resistance. We describe results of general mathematical models and a case study showing how simulation models, spatially explicit statistical models and other experimental data on pest dynamics, biological control and management have been applied to better understand and manage evolution of resistance to the JHA pyriproxyfen by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. Modeling and experimental studies show how genetic, ecological, and human factors affect evolution of pest resistance to JHAs. Integrating knowledge of these factors into models can help to produce useful predictions about pest resistance to JHAs and to improve management strategies for preserving the effectiveness of this important class of insecticides.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014