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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BASES OF HEALTH-PROMOTING FOOD COMPONENTS IN PREVENTION OF CHRONIC DISEASES

Location: Diet, Genomics and Immunology Lab

Title: Strong and weak plasma response to dietary carotenoids identified by cluster analysis and linked to beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms

Authors
item Wang, Thomas
item Edwards, Allison -
item Clevidence, Beverly

Submitted to: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 8, 2013
Publication Date: August 1, 2013
Citation: Wang, T.T., Edwards, A.J., Clevidence, B.A. 2013. Strong and weak plasma response to dietary carotenoids identified by cluster analysis and linked to beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 24(8):1538-1546.

Interpretive Summary: The mechanisms as well as the genetics underlying bioavailability and metabolism of health promoting carotenoids in humans remain unclear. To address these questions USDA scientists, in collaboration with a FDA scientist, examined the effects of individual responses of the carotenoids lycopene, beta-carotene, phytoene, and phytofluene to watermelon and tomato juice supplements. Using cluster analysis, individual, temporal response of plasma carotenoids was analyzed from a controlled-diet study of adults who consumed carotenoid-containing juices. Treatments given daily for 3 wks were watermelon juice at two levels (20 mg lycopene, 2.5 mg beta-carotene, n=23 and 40 mg lycopene, 5 mg beta-carotene, n=12) and tomato juice (18 mg lycopene, 0.6 mg beta-carotene, n=10). The temporal plasma response of individual subjects to these diets differed leading to classification as efficient responders or non-efficient responders for beta-carotene, lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene. Individuals who were efficient and non-efficient responders for one carotenoid were not necessarily efficient and non-efficient responders for another carotenoid. Individual responsiveness was found to be associated with genetic variants of the carotenoid metabolizing enzyme beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 but not beta-carotene 9,10 -monooxygenase. These results support the concept that individuals absorb, metabolize, utilize, or store carotenoids differently and that bioavailability of carotenoids may involve specific genetic variants of beta-carotene15,15'-monooxygenase1. This work provides novel information for carotenoids bioavailability research, as well as indentifying the significance of individual difference. The information serves as an important basis for future investigation of bioavailability and efficacies of diet-derived health-promoting phytochemicals. This work will benefit basic, as well as translational research science.

Technical Abstract: The mechanisms as well the genetics underlying bioavailability and metabolism of carotenoids in humans remains unclear. The individual temporal response of plasma carotenoids was analyzed in adults who consumed carotenoid-containing juices on a controlled-diet study using cluster analysis. Treatments given daily for 3 wk were watermelon juice at two levels (20 mg lycopene, 2.5 mg beta-carotene, n=23 and 40 mg lycopene, 5 mg beta-carotene, n=12) and tomato juice (18 mg lycopene, 0.6 mg beta-carotene, n=10). Temporal plasma response of individual subjects to these diets differed allowing classification as efficient responders or non-efficient responders for beta-carotene, lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene. Individuals who were efficient and non-efficient responders for one carotenoid were not necessarily efficient and non-efficient responders for another carotenoid. Individual responsiveness was found to be associated with genetic variants of the carotenoid metabolizing enzyme beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 but not beta-carotene 9,10 -monooxygenase. These results support the concept that individuals absorb, metabolize, utilize, or store carotenoids differently and that bioavailability of carotenoids may involve specific genetic variants of beta-carotene15,15'-monooxygenase1. Supported by funds appropriated for ARS Project Plan 1235-51530-053-00D.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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