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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Alternatives to methyl bromide soil fumigation for vegetable and floriculture production

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Susceptibility of several common subtropical weeds to Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica

Authors
item Burelle, Nancy
item Rosskopf, Erin

Submitted to: Journal of Nematology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 10, 2012
Publication Date: June 1, 2012
Citation: Burelle, N.K., Rosskopf, E.N. 2012. Susceptibility of several common subtropical weeds to Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica. Journal of Nematology. 44(2):142-147.

Interpretive Summary: Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse to assess galling and egg production of three root-knot nematode species, Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica, on several weeds common to Florida agricultural land. Weeds evaluated were Amaranthus retroflexus (redroot pigweed), Aeschynomene americana (American jointvetch), Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge), Eleusine indica (goosegrass), Portulaca oleracea (common purslane), and Solanum americanum (American black nightshade). Weeds were produced from seed and inoculated with 1000 nematode eggs when plants reached the two true leaf stage. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rutgers’) was included as a positive control. Aeschynomene americana and P. oleracea roots supported the highest number of juveniles (J2) of all three species of Meloidogyne tested, and had the highest number of eggs/g root for each of the Meloidogyne species tested. However, though P. oleracea supported very high root levels of the three nematodes tested, its fleshy roots did not exhibit severe gall symptoms. Low levels of apparent galling, combined with high egg production, increase the potential for P. oleracea to affect populations of these three species of root-knot nematodes to a degree that may not be appropriately recognized. This research quantifies the impact of P. oleracea as a host for M. incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica compared to several other important weeds commonly found in Florida agricultural production.

Technical Abstract: Experiments were conducted in the greenhouse to assess galling and egg production of three root-knot nematode species, Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica, on several weeds common to Florida agricultural land. Weeds evaluated were Amaranthus retroflexus (redroot pigweed), Aeschynomene americana (American jointvetch), Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge), Eleusine indica (goosegrass), Portulaca oleracea (common purslane), and Solanum americanum (American black nightshade). Weeds were produced from seed and inoculated with 1000 nematode eggs when plants reached the two true leaf stage. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rutgers’) was included as a positive control. Aeschynomene americana and P. oleracea roots supported the highest number of juveniles (J2) of all three species of Meloidogyne tested, and had the highest number of eggs/g root for each of the Meloidogyne species tested. However, though P. oleracea supported very high root levels of the three nematodes tested, its fleshy roots did not exhibit severe gall symptoms. Low levels of apparent galling, combined with high egg production, increase the potential for P. oleracea to affect populations of these three species of root-knot nematodes to a degree that may not be appropriately recognized. This research quantifies the impact of P. oleracea as a host for M. incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica compared to several other important weeds commonly found in Florida agricultural production.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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