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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONSERVATION, MANAGEMENT AND GENETIC ENHANCEMENT OF SORGHUM GENETIC RESOURCES AND ASSOCIATED INFORMATION Title: Reaction to rust by a subset of sorghum accessions from Zimbabwe

Authors
item Cuevas, Hugo
item Prom, Louis
item Magill, Clint -

Submitted to: Asian Journal of Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 2, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Citation: Cuevas, H.E., Prom, L.K., Magill, C. 2012. Reaction to rust by a subset of sorghum accessions from Zimbabwe. Asian Journal of Plant Pathology. 6(2):33-40.

Interpretive Summary: Sorghum rust (Puccinia purpurea) is a foliar disease that affects its productivity worldwide, and predisposes the plant to other major diseases. In this study, 68 sorghum accessions from the Zimbabwe collection maintained by the USDA-ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit at Griffin, Georgia, were evaluated in Isabela, Puerto Rico to identify new sources of rust resistance. Twelve accessions showed a resistance response, but PI482787 showed the highest level of resistance. This work identified new sources of rust resistance that could be used in sorghum improvement breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: Sorghum rust (Puccinia purpurea) is a foliar disease that affects sorghum productivity worldwide. The use of resistant sources is the most effective and stable way to control the disease. In this study, 68 sorghum accessions from the Zimbabwe collection maintained by the USDA-ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit at Griffin, Georgia, were evaluated in Isabela, Puerto Rico, during two planting seasons in 2011 to identify new sources of rust resistance. Across the two growing seasons, 12 accessions showed resistance, 15 accessions exhibited a moderately susceptible response, and 41 accessions showed a susceptible response. Variation in disease response was observed within and between experiments for 37 accessions. No rust infection was detected on PI482787 across the two growing seasons, while accession PI482795 exhibited the highest rust infection. This work identified new sources of rust resistance, and shows that PI482787 possess gene(s) for rust resistance and that this accession could be used in sorghum improvement breeding programs.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014