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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR INSECT PESTS OF ORCHARD CROPS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Chemical and behavioral analysis of the cuticular hydrocarbons from Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri

Authors
item Mann, R -
item Rouseff, R -
item Smoot, J -
item Rao, N -
item Meyer, W -
item Lapointe, Stephen
item Robbins, Paul
item Cha, Dong
item Linn, C -
item Webster, F -
item Tiwari, S -
item Stelinski, L -

Submitted to: Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 21, 2012
Publication Date: May 28, 2013
Citation: Mann, R.S., Rouseff, R.L., Smoot, J., Rao, N., Meyer, W.L., Lapointe, S.L., Robbins, P.S., Cha, D.H., Linn, C.E., Webster, F.X., Tiwari, S., Stelinski, L.L. 2013. Chemical and behavioral analysis of the cuticular hydrocarbons from Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Insect Science. 20:367-378.

Interpretive Summary: Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the vector of the disease organism, a bacterium that lives in the vascular tissues of the plant and is presumed to cause HLB. Laboratory and field studies examined the behavioral responses of male and female D. citri to compounds obtained by dissolving the external coating (cuticle) of their exoskeleton. More male psyllids were attracted to one, five, or 10 female cuticular extracts compared with blank controls. The results were confirmed in field studies in which clear or yellow traps baited with 10 female cuticular extract equivalent units attracted more males compared with clear traps baited with male cuticular extract or unbaited traps. Analyses of cuticular constituents of male and female D. citri revealed differences between the sexes in chemical composition of their cuticular extracts. Laboratory bioassays with synthetic chemicals identified from cuticular extracts indicated that dodecanoic acid attracted more males than clean air. Traps baited with dodecanoic acid did not increase total catch of D. citri compared with blank traps at the dosages tested; however, the sex ratio of psyllid catch was male-biased on traps baited with the highest lure loading dosage tested (10,000 µg).

Technical Abstract: Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the vector of the phloem-inhabiting bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which is presumed to cause HLB. Laboratory and field studies were conducted to examine the behavioral responses of male and female D. citri to their cuticular extracts. In olfactometer assays, more male D. citri were attracted to one, five, or 10 female cuticular extract equivalent units compared with blank controls. The results were confirmed in field studies in which clear or yellow traps baited with 10 female cuticular extract equivalent units attracted more males compared with clear traps baited with male cuticular extract or unbaited traps. Analyses of cuticular constituents of male and female D. citri revealed differences between the sexes in chemical composition of their cuticular extracts. Laboratory bioassays with synthetic chemicals identified from cuticular extracts indicated that dodecanoic acid attracted more males than clean air. Traps baited with dodecanoic acid did not increase total catch of D. citri compared with blank traps at the dosages tested; however, the sex ratio of psyllid catch was male-biased on traps baited with the highest lure loading dosage tested (10,000 µg).

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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