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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE DRYLAND CROPPING SYSTEM FOR THE CENTRAL GREAT PLAINS

Location: Central Plains Resources Management Research

Title: Organic amendment and residue removal rates influence soil productivity

Authors
item Mikha, Maysoon
item Schlegel, Alan -

Submitted to: Extension Reports
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: February 24, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Citation: Mikha, M.M., Schlegel, A.J. 2012. Organic amendment and residue removal rates influence soil productivity. Extension Reports. 1066:29-30.

Interpretive Summary: Interest in using crop residues as a renewable feedstock for biofuel production is great, but removing crop residue could have a negative impact on soil organic C (SOC) levels, and consequently on soil quality and plant productivity. Management practices that include adding organic residue as a nitrogen (N) source could compensate for removing the residue and prevent the deterioration of soil quality and grain yield through time. The objectives of this study are to (1) identify the rate of residue removal that maintains soil productivity and (2) evaluate the advantages of using beef manure as an N source vs. commercial fertilizer as a replacement for crop residue. The preliminary data suggest that manure addition improved the productivity compared with commercial fertilizer. The influence of residue removal will be evaluated in subsequent years.

Technical Abstract: Removing crop residue could affect different soil quality parameters and plant produc¬tivity. The first objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of removing crop residue at different rates (0%, 45–55%, and 60–85%) on crop productivity. The second objective is to assess the advantages to soil productivity of using an organic amendment instead of crop residue. In 2011, an irrigated continuous corn study site was established at the Kansas State University Southwest Research-Extension Center in Tribune, KS. Incorporated beef manure was compared with commercial fertilizer (urea) applied at 180 lb N/a. The preliminary data suggest that manure addition improved the productivity compared with commercial fertilizer. The influence of residue removal will be evaluated in subsequent years.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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