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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC AND GENOMIC APPROACHES TO IMPROVE INSECT RESISTANCE AND OTHER VALUE-ADDED TRAITS IN WHEAT, BARLEY, AND SORGHUM Title: Safeguarding world wheat and barley production against Russian wheat aphid: An international pre-breeding initiative

Authors
item Cakir, Mehmet -
item Vitou, Janine -
item Lawson, Wendy -
item Haley, Scott -
item Peairs, Frank -
item Mornhinweg, Dolores
item Bohssini, Mustafa -
item Ogbonnaya, Francis -
item Lage, Jacob -
item Tolmay, Vicky -
item Malinga, Joyce -
item Edwards, Owain -
item Christopher, Mandy -
item Castro, Ana -
item Franckowiak, Jerome -
item Kuchel, Haydn -
item Jacobs, Bertus -
item Barclay, Lain -
item Gelalcha, Solomon -
item Sheppard, John -

Submitted to: Annual International Plant & Animal Genome Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 9, 2010
Publication Date: January 11, 2010
Citation: Cakir, M., Vitou, J., Lawson, W., Haley, S., Peairs, F., Mornhinweg, D.W., Bohssini, M., Ogbonnaya, F., Lage, J., Tolmay, V., Malinga, J., Edwards, O., Christopher, M., Castro, A.M., Franckowiak, J., Kuchel, H., Jacobs, B., Barclay, L., Gelalcha, S., Sheppard, J. 2010. Safeguarding world wheat and barley production against Russian wheat aphid: An international pre-breeding initiative [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the XVIII Annual International Plant & Animal Genome Conference, January 9-13, 2010, San Diego, California. p. 322.

Technical Abstract: The Russian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia, is one of the most damaging insect pests of wheat and barley throughout the World. This aphid, although is not yet present in Australia, is extremely damaging with up to 70% yield loses in wheat and barley producing lands, causing significant financial losses to the grains farmers. The objectives of the study are to: 1) identify available RWA resistant wheat and barley germplasm from around the world and characterize against available RWA biotypes in various countries; 2) identify molecular markers closely linked to new resistance genes; and 3) introgress RWA resistance into more adapted wheat and barley backgrounds from Australia, Kenya, Ethiopia, where possible including Ug99 resistance into introgressions. To date, over 70 wheat lines and 20 barley lines were evaluated in standard seedling screening tests against a number of RWA biotypes collected from Mexico, Hungary, South Africa, and France in Montpellier, France, and endemic biotypes in USA, Kenya, South Africa, Syria, and Argentina. Lines with moderate to good levels of resistance were identified. Diversity analysis of RWA resistant barley and wheat lines with the molecular markers will be discussed. Optimization of published markers in wheat and barley, and identification of new markers for new sources of resistances will be reported. To date two genes for RWA resistance have been mapped on the chromosomes 1D and 7D and closely linked markers have been identified. Introgression of resistance genes to adapted wheat and barley lines is progressing well. As we have identified some wheat lines that are resistant to both RWA and Ug99 in Kenya, the work and strategies of introgressing Ug99 resistance along with RWA resistance in Kenya and Ethiopia will also be discussed.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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